NGO Participation Working Group

The participation of NGOs in the climate negotiations is key to remind governments of their responsibility to adopt an adequate climate agreement based on equity and science. NGO participation also ensures that actors are held accountable. The status of observers in the climate negotiations does not, however, allow NGOs to contribute with expertise and insights from communities as much as other UN fora do. The NGO Participation working group reviews procedures and practices related to the role of NGOs in the talks and advocates for more inclusive and transparent negotiations. Also, participation of local stakeholders is crucial in the implementation of mechanisms established under the Convention when the decisions adopted at the international level have direct impacts on local communities. The NGO Participation working group works with other CAN working groups to ensure that these mechanisms involve local stakeholders.

For more information please contact:
Sebastien Duyck, CIEL, duycks@gmail.com
Alyssa Johl, CIEL, ajohl@ciel.org

Statement regarding cost recovery policy on behalf of all observer constituencies

Even though the Secretariat and Parties keep saying that civil society plays a critical role in the negotiations, there’s very little they’re doing to help us participate effectively. The proposed cost recovery policy for side events and exhibits is a case in point. The following is the collective response on behalf of all non-governmental observer constituencies, which offers to work with the Secretariat and Parties to find a real and sustainable solution. Why not give us more than four days and an open and participatory process to do so.

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CAN Submission: Views on Suggested Changes to the Modalities and Procedures (M&Ps) for the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM), May 2014

Civil Society Participation in the CDM process (TP Section F2)

Although stakeholder consultation is a key requirement in the CDM registration process, project developers and Designated Operational Entities (DOEs) lack clear criteria or guidance on how to conduct and validate stakeholder consultations. In many cases, peoples and communities that are directly affected are not adequately informed about CDM project activities or programme of activities (PoA) and their potential on-the-ground impacts.

Organization: 

Stop Climate Madness!

Watch as civil society demands climate action at the UN climate talks. We were heard in the plenary and "welcomed" the COP president with our chanting just as he arrived: perfect timing!

Civil society in COP 19 stadium stands in solidarity with the Philippines and those holding vigils across the world.

We also stand in solidarity with our colleagues who walked out of what has, so far, been an ugly round of UN climate talks with a lot of backtracking by some of the biggest emitters - at a time when typhoon Haiyan tells us more clearly than ever that we need to do more, rather than less.  

From here we must go back to our capitals, mobilize political power, and demand action to stop this climate madness. 

Dear Japan:

Hello and welcome, Mr. Japanese Minister!

We would like to introduce ourselves, as we did not have a chance to meet you here in Warsaw.

We have met the Japanese ministers at every Conference of the Parties since COP 2, held in 1996. We are wondering why the honorable Minister of Japan did not have the time to meet us in civil society this time around, and explain Japan's new ‘ambitious’ emissions target of 3.1% above 1990 levels by 2020 .

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