G20 Working Group

The objective of the G20 Working Group is to influence the G20 countries and to work with relevant stakeholders to ensure that G20’s policies promote sustainable development, with a particular focus on increasing investments into energy efficiency and renewable energy, ensuring development planning in line with full decarbonization and to make finance available to poorer countries to ensure that these countries can adapt to climate change and put infrastructure and policies in place that are climate friendly.

Letter to G7 Sherpas: Make climate change a priority

To                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            25 April 2017

The Sherpas of the G7, under the Italian Presidency

Re: The 3rd G7 Sherpa’s meeting on 26-27 April

Dear Ambassadors,

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G20 Issue Brief: Sustainable Infrastructure

The additional up-front investment required for a sustainable infrastructure pathway by 2030 is estimated at less than 5% above baseline levels, and is very likely to be more than “offset” by the resulting energy and fuel savings from modern clean energy and energy efficiency, with large additional benefits resulting from avoided climate impacts and air pollution related health costs, as well as reduced risk of stranded assets. Present externalities of and subsidies to burning fossil fuels amount to a staggering 6.5% of global GDP.

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G20 Issue Brief: Phasing Out Fossil Fuel Subsidies

It is estimated that fossil fuel subsidies contributed up to 36% of global emissions between 1980 and 2010, while also exacerbating health problems, air and water local pollution. Limiting their use is a key step towards reducing inequality and achieving inclusive growth, since fossil fuel subsidies disproportionately benefit the middle and upper classes. Fossil fuel subsidies constitute an inefficient use of scarce public funds, and inhibit the market penetration of price-competitive renewables.

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G20 Issue Brief: Ratification of the Montreal Protocol Amendment on HFCs

In the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol adopted in 2016, parties agreed to phase-down hydrofluorocarbons, the fastest growing climate pollutants. Once implemented, this phase-down could prevent emissions of 80 GtCO2e by 2050, reducing global warming by up to 0.5ºC by the end of the century compared to business as usual.

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G20 Issue Brief: Long-term Strategies

The Paris Agreement calls for countries to formulate long-term low-GHG emission development strategies, in line with pursuing efforts to limiting global temperature increase to 1.5ºC. With the 2016 adoption of Agenda 2030, countries are also beginning to implement policies to fulfil the sustainable development goals (SDGs).

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CAN Statement on the 2016 G20 Summit: A strong take-off , but a bumpy landing on climate change

Hangzhou, China, 5 September 2016: Climate Action Network welcomed the US and China’s ratification of the Paris Agreement on the eve of the G20 summit here. However, civil society groups are disappointed that more countries did not follow suit.  Moreover, the final G20 communique published today was overall low on details, weak in tone and failed to make strong commitments on fighting climate change.

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CAN Briefing: G20 Key Demands, July 2016

In December 2015, the G20, as part of the 196 Parties to the UNFCCC, committed to a historic global agreement to address climate change and pursue efforts to limit the global temperature increase to 1.5°C above preindustrial levels, so as to mitigate the harmful effects on the world’s people, biodiversity and the global environment.

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CAN Briefing Paper: G20 Recommendations, November 2015

Held only two weeks before the UNFCCC COP21, the G20 Summit presents a unique opportunity to strengthen international confidence and momentum towards an ambitious climate agreement in Paris and to show commitment to low-emission and climate-resilient development by the biggest economies in the world.

Climate Action Network identified three key issues G20 countries need to assume a leadership role to send strong signals to Paris:

- Climate Finance
- Adaptation and Loss & Damage
- Emission reduction and economic transformation

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