Bunkers Working Group

International aviation and shipping are inherently global sectors, and emissions from these sectors occur either on the high seas or in flights between countries, and are thus difficult to allocate to individual countries. For this reason they are not included in national emissions reduction targets. The CAN Bunkers working group (whose name derives from the “bunker” fuels used by ships and aircraft) advocates for measures to control and reduce emissions from these sectors under the UNFCCC, International Maritime Organization (IMO) and International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), in particular market-based measures that can regulate and cap emissions, while also generating revenue that can be used for climate finance.

For more information please contact:
Mark Lutes, WWF International, mark.lutes@wwf.panda.org

CAN Briefing: G20 Key Demands, July 2016

In December 2015, the G20, as part of the 196 Parties to the UNFCCC, committed to a historic global agreement to address climate change and pursue efforts to limit the global temperature increase to 1.5°C above preindustrial levels, so as to mitigate the harmful effects on the world’s people, biodiversity and the global environment.

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CAN Position: New, Innovative Sources of Climate Finance, May 2015

~~The gap between the need for adaptation and loss and damage finance and the current finance provided or committed is large and growing. It has been estimated that each year US$150 billion will be needed for adaptation and loss and damage by 2025, even if warming is kept below 2 degrees. When compared with the currently provided sum of approximately $20-23bn per year and the current warming trajectory of approximately 4 degrees, the scale of the challenge is clear.  There is also a growing gap in mitigation finance.

Bunkers: No More Evasive Maneuvers

The way things are going, ships and airplanes will be able to cruise the seas and skies without serious emissions control measures for some years to come. Earlier this year the International Maritime Organization (IMO) indefinitely suspended its consideration of market based measures (MBMs) that can put a cap and a price on emissions in line with the polluter-pays principle.

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