CAN Statement on the Outcome of the US Elections

09 November 2016, Marrakech: The climate movement is a people’s movement. 103 countries have ratified the Paris Agreement, testimony to the power of people to push their governments to act on climate change. Climate Action Network is determined to build on and carry forward on this momentum despite uncertainties and political shocks that threaten to derail our focus, to defend the millions of people already impacted by the devastating consequences of climate change and to leave behind a safer, cleaner and more secure world for future generations.

The climate movement goes beyond national governments to represent a broad and diverse coalition of cities, businesses, local communities and individuals. No one government or individual, however powerful, can deny the transformational change that is unfolding before us and the growing scientific evidence that we must act urgently to move away from destructive fossil fuels and embrace a 100% renewable energy future.
President-elect Trump must recognise the moral, economic and social imperative to lead and act on climate change and carry forward the commitments made by the United States under the Paris Agreement.

Below are some reactions from CAN members on the outcome from the US Elections.

“The economics of energy are already changing rapidly, home grown wind and solar are increasingly becoming the cheapest forms of energy and falling costs in technology continue to show us the direction of travel. The benefits are already being recognised by a number of US states which are harnessing their abundant clean energy resources. It’s also popular with the American public. A recent Pew Research Centre study showed that 83 per cent of American adults support expanding wind farms, while 89 per cent support solar expansion.  Although the US will certainly suffer from any obstruction of efforts to stop climate change, it also risks the lives of millions of the world’s poorest people who have done nothing to cause the problem yet are the most vulnerable to its effects.” Mohamed Adow, Senior Climate Advisor, Christian Aid

“President-elect Trump has the opportunity to catalyze further action on climate that sends a clear signal to investors to keep the transition to a renewable-powered economy on track. China, India, and other economic competitors are racing to be the global clean energy superpower, and the US doesn’t want to be left behind.” Tina Johnson, Policy Director, US Climate Action Network

“The new president must protect the people he serves from climate chaos. No personal belief or political affiliation can change the stark truth that every new oil well and pipeline pushes us closer to catastrophe. The administration has moral and legal obligations to meet international commitments and go further to curb pollution and keep dirty fossil fuels in the ground.” Maya Golden-Krasner, Senior Attorney, Center for Biological Diversity

“We have a new administration and a new opportunity to surge forward on climate action. The Obama administration moved mountains to rally the world around combatting climate change. Our new president needs to carry that legacy forward and make good on the promise to make America into the world’s clean energy superpower. US leadership is needed to turn the international consensus of the Paris Agreement into concrete global action, and it starts by charting our own path to a low-carbon future.” Mariana Panuncio-Feldman, World Wildlife Fund's (WWF) senior director of international climate cooperation

“Trump’s election is a disaster, but it cannot be the end of the international climate process. We’re not giving up the fight and neither should the international community. Trump will try and slam the brakes on climate action, which means we need to throw all of our weight on the accelerator. In the United States, the climate movement will put everything on the line to protect the progress we’ve made and continue to push for bold action. We need the rest of the world to charge ahead and look beyond the White House to partner with civil society, businesses, and local governments who are still committed to climate action. Our work becomes much harder now, but it’s not impossible, and we refuse to give up hope.” May Boeve, Executive Director, 350.org 

“Climate change is already having major impacts on the lives of millions of people in the United States and around the world. Droughts, flooding and other types of extreme weather events are becoming stronger and more frequent, and the U.S. is not immune. This is a global crisis that President-elect Trump will have to address. “The U.S. has joined the Paris Agreement and must continue to meet its climate obligations. Leaving this important international agreement will damage our credibility with important overseas partners and would be a major setback in the fight against climate change.” Kelly Stone, ActionAid Policy Analyst

"It is regrettable that the next US President has not yet understood that the world is on track to phase out fossil fuels. While it is clear that Mr Trump cannot withdraw the US nor undermine the Paris Agreement, there is a risk for the US to miss the boat in a race to a renewable future. There is however no fear that the world’s ongoing energy shift would be troubled by this election result. As more than a half of all countries in the world have ratified the Paris Agreement, it is clear that the Paris momentum will continue no matter who the President of the US is." Ulriikka Aarnio  International Climate policy coordinator Climate Action Network Europe

“The world knows that a prosperous future is one that runs on clean energy. Despite the outcome of the US Election today, cities and businesses and other countries will continue to lead on climate and work to ensure a fair, practical transition for workers entering the new economy. At the North American Leaders’ Summit in June, Canada, Mexico and the United States agreed to work together to develop a continent-wide clean electricity grid and to reduce methane emissions. These actions serve our national and regional interests as much today as they did yesterday and must be taken forward.” Catherine Abreu, Executive Director, Climate Action Network Canada

"Donald Trump now has the unflattering distinction of being the only head of state in the entire world to reject the scientific consensus that humans are driving climate change. No matter what happens, Donald Trump can’t change the fact that wind and solar energy are rapidly becoming more affordable and accessible than dirty fossil fuels. With both the market and grassroots environmental advocacy moving us toward clean energy, there is still a strong path forward for reducing climate pollution even under a Trump presidency. Still, this is a time for tough choices. Trump must choose whether he will be a President remembered for putting America and the world on a path to climate disaster, or for listening to the American public and keeping us on a path to climate progress. Trump better choose wisely, otherwise - we can guarantee him the hardest fight of his life every step of the way.” Michael Brune, Executive Director, Sierra Club.

“On this horrific morning, U.S. youth denounce and grieve the election of Donald Trump. We stand in global solidarity with communities all over the world that have been impacted by U.S. climate injustice and imperialism. We also stand with marginalized communities across the U.S. who wake up in fear this morning: fear of deportation, fear of violence, fear of being silenced, imprisoned or killed in their struggles. It is now up to us to enact the just and stable future we believe in.” Ryan Camero, Media and Communications Lead, SustainUS

For more information, contact Dharini Parthasarathy, Communications Coordinator, Policy, CAN- International; email: dparthasarathy@climatenetwork.org, or call on +212600545716.

About Climate Action Network:
Climate Action Network (CAN) is a global network of over 1200 NGOs working to promote government and individual action to limit human-induced climate change to ecologically sustainable levels. www.climatenetwork.org

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