Press Releases

CAN is an important, critical voice in the international climate policy process. The network’s regular press briefings and commentary help journalists and their audience make sense of what can be a baffling process, even to those who have been covering it for years.

CAN helps coordinate and amplify the communications work of its 850 members around major international climate processes. CAN also provides an important capacity building role for some members interested in boosting their communications efforts.

You can find a range of our latest resources and releases below:

Lima Summit shows climate politics lagging behind real world momentum

Big issues punted to Paris

Lima, Peru, December 14, 2014: All eyes will turn to the leaders of the governments who have signed off on an outcome at the UN climate talks in Lima today which neither reflects the growing public support for the ongoing transition from fossil fuels to renewable energies nor the urgency to accelerate this transition.

The Lima Decision reaffirmed that governments are now on the spot to put the individual climate pledges on table in the first half of next year, that will form the foundations of the global climate agreement due in Paris next December, but some of the big issues that have been plaguing the talks for years were shirked and could cause headaches later on.

When it comes down to it, these talks shows governments are disconnected from their people who are worried about climate risks and want a just transition to boost our economies, deliver jobs and strengthen public health. Increasingly domestic issues, whether they are elections or decisions about major projects such as the KeystoneXL pipeline in the US and the Galilee basin in Australia, will be seen as a country’s intention on climate change.

While governments were able to hide in Lima, they won’t have that luxury in Paris where the world will be expecting them to deliver an agreement, not shoe-gazing.

"The talks took place in the wake of worsening climate impacts hitting communities around the world, like Typhoon Hagupit in the Philippines which has highlighted to ensure communities can adapt and to providing support for the loss and damage they experience when they can no longer adapt" said Mohamed Adow, Senior Climate Advisor at Christian Aid.

“There is an elephant in the room at these negotiations - we’ve not managed to entice it out. Working out how to fairly share the workload of tackling climate change between developed and developing countries has become the major stumbling block on the road to Paris.”  

Samantha Smith, Leader, WWF Global Climate and Energy Initiative said “Governments crucially failed to agree on specific plans to cut emissions before 2020 that would have laid the ground for ending the fossil fuel era and accelerated the move toward renewable energy and increased energy efficiency. The science is clear that delaying action until 2020 will make it near impossible to avoid the worst impacts of climate change, yet political expediency won over scientific urgency. Instead of leadership, they delivered a lackluster plan with little scientific relevancy.”

Winnie Byanyima, Executive Director of Oxfam International said, "there is still a vast and growing gulf between the approach of some climate negotiators and the public demand for action. This outcome can only be seen as a call to action for people around the world. Governments will not deliver the solutions we need unless more people stand up to make our voices heard. We must continue to build a stronger movement to counteract the narrow interests that are preventing action."

In a positive contrast, negotiators here in Lima were in sync with the emerging consensus around the world that we need to phase out fossil fuels, illustrated by this phaseout surviving as one of the options listed in the current list of options for the Paris agreement. Governments need to get to real work at the next UN climate session in February, in Geneva, to convert the options into plain English, legal negotiating text.

Tags: 
Organization: 

New energy emerging around plans for national climate action commitments at COP20

Despite slow progress on the penultimate day of the UN climate negotiations in Lima, new energy has emerged around constructive proposals from Latin American countries on guidelines on what countries in wildly varying positions should put forward as their climate action commitments under the new global agreement due at the end of next year.

The Vasudha Foundation’s senior advisor Rahman Mehta said many countries wanted clarity on the expectations for who will do what, before making their own commitment, or Intended Nationally Determined Contribution, early next year.

A proposal under discussion would see countries choose the kinds of actions they undertake as part of their commitment under the Paris agreement, for example economy wide or sectoral mitigation actions, but the rules about the kind of information they provide on that contribution would be set.  

“That way each country determines their own actions, but they are transparent about what those actions include and the effect they are likely to have,” Mehta said. “This would apply across the board on all actions, including finance and mitigation.”

Developing countries have been clear that a decision on climate finance in Lima which paves the way for the delivery of the previously promised USD100 billion a year in support by 2020, is needed to get a strong agreement.  

“Finance is a big piece of the jigsaw puzzle that could change the whole picture,” Mehta said. “At the moment many of the countries opposing important rules for INDCs are concerned because they feel they do not have the necessary financial support - they want a level playing field and unless they feel this is what they are getting, they are not prepared to face scrutiny over their own commitments.”

Yesterday and today Peru and Colombia pledged funds to the Green Climate Fund in a positive move that could help to shake up the current impasse around climate finance contributions.  

RAC France’s European policy officer Celia Gautier said other ways to ensure climate action headed in the right direction was to turn the so-called “workstream two” element  of the talks into a robust, well-financed platform which could scale up renewable energy and energy efficiency around the world. 

At the start of this week, there was a move by developed countries to rip out of the draft COP decision text language that would see the Green Climate Fund provide cash towards such efforts. 

“Lets be clear, that unless we provide finance and capacity building support to developing countries who are looking to do more, this element of the talks will be a toothless tiger,” Gautier said. 

“This is bizarre - there's been amazing progress this year on renewable energy as well as initiatives to drive efficiency in cities, by businesses and by citizens  and we've been reminded time and time again that acting now is more cheaper and more effective than waiting.” 

“Countries need to find  a way to integrate these developments in this process in a meaningful way which could also land the Paris agreement much more easily.”

Winnie Byanyima, executive director of Oxfam International said “There are many critical issues that must be resolved here in Lima so a deal could be secured in Paris next year. 

“Progress is far too slow,” she said. “But while we must follow these issues closely, sometimes it is easy to forget what these talks are really about. Underneath the technical details we discuss here, this conference is really about human rights. It is about the right to food, the right to water the right to land and the right to stand up for these rights. All over the world people are losing those rights, and it is our job here in Lima to restore them.”

Clear rules on national climate commitments need to come from COP20: CAN

 

December 9, 2014, Lima, Peru: On the eve of the largest ever climate march in Latin America, government ministers from around the world are arriving in town to undertake high-level negotiations at the UN climate talks (COP20). 

It is expected that the march, which will feature indigenous groups, teachers, trade unions, and youth coalitions calling for the scaling up of climate action, can result in an acceleration of the negotiations here in Lima. After the release of the new draft texts yesterday, progress has been slow as country’s reconfigure their approaches. Ministers need to solve some crunch issues , like the rules for country pledges and a roadmap on finance, in order to pave the way for a successful climate agreement next year in Paris.

CARE’s climate change advocacy coordinator, Sven Harmeling, says by setting clear, effective guidelines on the scope and format of country pledges (or Intended Nationally Determined Contributions) together with deciding on a robust method of assessment, ministers at these negotiations can play a significant role in getting us on the right track. 

“At the moment we run the risk of having to compare apples with oranges - if we don't clearly define what countries must include in their national climate commitments towards the new agreement due in Paris next year, then it will be extremely difficult to understand how much progress is being made to curb climate change,” Harmeling says. “Especially as our collective effort will directly affect the intensity of climate impacts experienced by vulnerable countries, we have to be able to compare pledges in a transparent, official assessment process, which must then trigger further action.”

Ministers participating in the high level finance meeting today also need to remove uncertainty around support for developing countries to take their own climate action hanging over these negotiations. Kelly Dent, head of delegation, Oxfam says: “finance is required for developing countries to get on low carbon development pathways and adapt to the climate impacts they are already experiencing,” says Dent. 

“But the EU and the US are trying to remove all reference to finance removed from pre-2020 roadmap and post-2020 Paris agreement. They are putting a blindfold on developing countries and saying ‘please trust us’. The time has come to stop using finance as a bargaining chip.”

Juan Carlos Soriano, Latin American coordinator, from 350.org says: “the 400,000 marchers in New York this September was just the start, we have sown a seed and the forest is growing - we are seeing more and more engagement on climate change.”

-------

Climate Action Network (CAN) is a global network of over 900 NGOs working to promote government and individual action to limit human-induced climate change to ecologically sustainable levels. More at: www.climatenetwork.org

Contact:  Ria Voorhaar, CAN International in Lima on 963 961 813 or +49 157 3173 5568 or email: rvoorhaar@climatenetwork.org,  

Tags: 

Ministers need to get down to business during week 2 at COP20

December 8, 2014, Lima, PeruToday at the UN climate negotiations in Lima, two new draft texts were released which could allow Ministers arriving tomorrow to make real progress on a robust climate action agreement due to be signed in Paris this time next year. 

One text outlines options for dealing with the elements to feature in the Paris agreement. The other, the draft COP decision, details options for the scope and format of country’s intended nationally determined contributions (INDCS) - due early next year - as well as featuring ways to scale up climate action now. 

Alden Meyer, director of strategy and policy for the Union of Concerned Scientists, outlined four key areas where Ministers can exert their influence and provide much-needed political guidance to negotiators over the coming days. 

“There are a range of crunch issues which are affecting the dynamics between countries here in Lima, and must be resolved to make significant progress towards the agreement in Paris at the end of next year,” Meyer says. 

“These include the need to make sure that national emissions reduction pledges are put forward every five years, starting for 2025, so that climate action is scaled up frequently, as well as setting clear expectations for countries putting forward fair but differentiated climate action contributions that reflect their varying capacities and responsibility for causing climate change.” 

“In addition, ministers can help clarify and strengthen language referring to loss and damage. Finally, they need to help reach decisions here in Lima that increase confidence that developed countries will, in fact, ramp up climate finance for developing countries to the promised level of $100 billion annually by 2020."

Harjeet Singh, international coordinator on adaptation from ActionAid International the demand of developing countries to include loss and damage as a separate element in the 2015 agreement had been heard. This came as Typhoon Hagiput prompted what has been reported as the the biggest peacetime mobilisation of people in the Philippines. 

However, Singh is concerned that some key elements on adaptation are still missing. 

“The text on the global goal for adaptation is very weak and needs to be improved,” says Singh. “Also, adaptation is not linked to rising temperatures which does not reflect the facts, so recently outlined by UNEP, that when global warming increases adaptation becomes much more difficult and costly. If you want to build confidence and ambition within this process we need more on loss and damage as well as  adaptation.” 

Ruth Davis, political advisor, for Greenpeace UK says the so-called elements text retained a number of options about how to ensure that the ultimate goal of the Paris agreement is to phase out fossil fuel pollution and get to zero carbon. “The text invites countries to consider what this would mean for their climate action plans over the long term,” Davis says.  And it contains proposals to drive investments away from fossil fuels and towards renewables and energy efficiency, and stopping public support for high carbon projects.”

She says these elements need to be captured and strengthened in the final Lima text if we want to see the political process here lining up with the events that are happening in the real world: hundreds of thousands of people around the world demanding climate action, countries like Germany showing you can quit coal and grow your economy, financial institutions like the Bank of England investigating the risks of high-carbon assets, and energy majors like E.ON turning their back on fossil fuels.  

 
-------

Climate Action Network (CAN) is a global network of over 900 NGOs working to promote government and individual action to limit human-induced climate change to ecologically sustainable levels. More at: www.climatenetwork.org

Contact:  Ria Voorhaar, CAN International in Lima on 963 961 813 or +49 157 3173 5568 or email: rvoorhaar@climatenetwork.org,  

Ministers need to get down to business during week 2 at COP20

December 8, 2014, Lima, PeruToday at the UN climate negotiations in Lima, two new draft texts were released which could allow Ministers arriving tomorrow to make real progress on a robust climate action agreement due to be signed in Paris this time next year. 

One text outlines options for dealing with the elements to feature in the Paris agreement. The other, the draft COP decision, details options for the scope and format of country’s intended nationally determined contributions (INDCS) - due early next year - as well as featuring ways to scale up climate action now. 

Alden Meyer, director of strategy and policy for the Union of Concerned Scientists, outlined four key areas where Ministers can exert their influence and provide much-needed political guidance to negotiators over the coming days. 

“There are a range of crunch issues which are affecting the dynamics between countries here in Lima, and must be resolved to make significant progress towards the agreement in Paris at the end of next year,” Meyer says. 

“These include the need to make sure that national emissions reduction pledges are put forward every five years, starting for 2025, so that climate action is scaled up frequently, as well as setting clear expectations for countries putting forward fair but differentiated climate action contributions that reflect their varying capacities and responsibility for causing climate change.” 

“In addition, ministers can help clarify and strengthen language referring to loss and damage. Finally, they need to help reach decisions here in Lima that increase confidence that developed countries will, in fact, ramp up climate finance for developing countries to the promised level of $100 billion annually by 2020."

Harjeet Singh, international coordinator on adaptation from ActionAid International the demand of developing countries to include loss and damage as a separate element in the 2015 agreement had been heard. This came as Typhoon Hagiput prompted what has been reported as the the biggest peacetime mobilisation of people in the Philippines. 

However, Singh is concerned that some key elements on adaptation are still missing. 

“The text on the global goal for adaptation is very weak and needs to be improved,” says Singh. “Also, adaptation is not linked to rising temperatures which does not reflect the facts, so recently outlined by UNEP, that when global warming increases adaptation becomes much more difficult and costly. If you want to build confidence and ambition within this process we need more on loss and damage as well as  adaptation.” 

Ruth Davis, political advisor, for Greenpeace UK says the so-called elements text retained a number of options about how to ensure that the ultimate goal of the Paris agreement is to phase out fossil fuel pollution and get to zero carbon. “The text invites countries to consider what this would mean for their climate action plans over the long term,” Davis says.  And it contains proposals to drive investments away from fossil fuels and towards renewables and energy efficiency, and stopping public support for high carbon projects.”

She says these elements need to be captured and strengthened in the final Lima text if we want to see the political process here lining up with the events that are happening in the real world: hundreds of thousands of people around the world demanding climate action, countries like Germany showing you can quit coal and grow your economy, financial institutions like the Bank of England investigating the risks of high-carbon assets, and energy majors like E.ON turning their back on fossil fuels.  

 
-------

Climate Action Network (CAN) is a global network of over 900 NGOs working to promote government and individual action to limit human-induced climate change to ecologically sustainable levels. More at: www.climatenetwork.org

Contact:  Ria Voorhaar, CAN International in Lima on 963 961 813 or +49 157 3173 5568 or email: rvoorhaar@climatenetwork.org,  

Rich countries wobble over explicit request to scale up climate action at COP20

December 6, 2014, Lima, Peru: As another brutal super typhoon bares down on the Philippines, developed countries at the UN climate negotiations in Lima (COP20) have baulked at specific measures that would have them scale up climate action now.

Tasneem Essop, head of advocacy and strategy for WWF International’s Global Climate and Energy Initiative said negotiators came to Lima riding a wave of optimism and hope.

“ After a few days of false starts, countries have rolled up their sleeves and are getting to work, but unfortunately, the negotiators don’t seem to want to get their hands dirty. They seem to have forgotten that they are here to solve a planetary emergency,” Essop says. 

“In particular, efforts to cut emissions before 2020 – when science says emissions must peak to avoid the worst consequences of climate change - have completely fallen off the political radar. Negotiators here are fixing the fire alarms while the building burns.”

In negotiations yesterday, the EU, Canada, the US, New Zealand and Australia deleted detailed references in the draft text related to a review or a revisit of their existing commitments in the pre-2020 period, with the excuse that it was covered in the Warsaw agreement. 

“What this COP needs is a consistent and explicit reminder of the actions required in now. Any deal that doesn’t address an emissions peak before 2020 is a sure fall into a quicksand of deadly climate impacts. We cannot sacrifice a scientifically and equitably sound deal for a weak political outcome in Paris.”

In a further threat to climate action, China, among others, is pushing back on creating a strong and transparent assessment of national climate contributions toward the new agreement due in Paris at the end of next year. 

With Typhoon Hagupit making landfall in the Philippines, one year after the devastation wrought by Super Typhoon Haiyan, the reality of the climate threat - and the need to help vulnerable communities deal with the crisis - could not be easier for all to see. 

Voltaire Alferez, national coordinator, Aksyon Klima Philippines says, “In the face of worsening impacts, like sea level rise, we do not want sympathy or pity, we want solidarity and action for those of us in vulnerable countries. We need this process to deliver.”

Julie-Anne Richards, manager international policy, from the Climate Justice Programme says after the Typhoon Haiyan struck the Philippines during the Warsaw climate negotiations last year, a new mechanism was established to help communities deal with climate impacts to which they cannot adapt - this is the so-called Warsaw Mechanism for Loss and Damage.

“It’s not possible to adapt to losing your family in a typhoon. It’s not possible to adapt to your island home going under water," Richards says. "It’s not possible to adapt when your farmland becomes a desert. These are examples of loss and damage, and they show why loss and damage is so important for vulnerable countries – who want assurance that they won’t be left to suffer." 

Under the loss and damage mechanism, which many countries want as a stand-alone pillar of the Paris agreement, wealthy countries need to mobilize support for climate vulnerable states. However, there are concerns that countries, led by the US, pushed back on ensuring adequate representation of vulnerable countries  on the committee managing the mechanism.

-------

Climate Action Network (CAN) is a global network of over 900 NGOs working to promote government and individual action to limit human-induced climate change to ecologically sustainable levels. More at: www.climatenetwork.org

Contact:  Ria Voorhaar, CAN International in Lima on 963 961 813 or +49 157 3173 5568 or email: rvoorhaar@climatenetwork.org,  

Tags: 
Topics: 

Climate Action Network Welcomes to the UNSG's High Level Report on SDGs

Climate Action Network has welcomed the launch by UN Secretary-General, Ban Ki-moon of the Synthesis Report of the Secretary-General On the Post-2015 Agenda, titled ‘The Road to Dignity by 2030: Ending Poverty, Transforming All Lives and Protecting the Planet’.

This report is the culmination of a number of strands of work over the last year, which started with Rio+20 in 2012, and will drive the next nine months of negotiations on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) which will be agreed in September in New York. The Sustainable Development Goals will act as the world’s to-do list to end poverty and will come into effect in January, 2016 and run til 2030.

The report places action on climate change at the heart of a set of principles to achieve sustainable development. The report not only keeps the door open for a standalone goal on climate change and also to ensure that all the SDGS are aligned with climate action. It thereby builds momentum towards both the agreement of strong and effective SDGs and a comprehensive, global agreement on climate change due in Paris in December next year.

Tags: 

CAN gives a wrap on week one of COP20 as yet another typhoon bears down on the Philippines

What: Climate Action Network members will brief reporters on progress made during the first week of the UN climate negotiations currently being held in Lima.  With ministers arriving on Tuesday, there's a need to push forward on the technical outline of key issues, such as the content and format of the national action commitments and the text of the 2015 agreement, so that top level political negotiations can proceed.

Sadly, the real and urgent need for a comprehensive climate action plan will be made clear again this weekend as the people of the Philippines brace to be hit by yet another typhoon. Speakers will explain that the country still picking up the pieces, after last year's brutal Typhoon Haiyan, a situation which throws into focus the limits to adaptation and the reason many developing countries are calling for a Loss and Damage Mechanism to be taken further at COP20 in Lima. 

When: Saturday, December 6, 2014, 11.30am Lima time  - (16.30GMT - 17.30CET - 8.30PST)

Where: Press conference room 2, Lima Climate Change Conference, Pentagonito, San Borja, Lima, Peru. 

Webcast: You can also watch the press conference live here. (video also available on demand afterwards)

Who

  • Tasneem Essop, Global Climate and Energy Initiative Head of Strategy and Advocay, WWF International 
  • Julie-Anne Richards, Manager International Policy, Climate Justice Programme
  • Voltaire P. Alferez, National Coordinator, Aksyon Klima Philippines
  • David Turnbull, Campaigns Director, Oil Change International

Contact: Ria Voorhaar, Climate Action Network, on : +49 157 3173 5568 or local number +51 963 961 813 or on email: rvoorhaar@climatenetwork.org

Tags: 

Progress in the first week of the UN climate negotiations - Still work to be done before Ministers arrive

 

 

December 5, 2014, Lima, Peru: Technical negotiations during the first week of the climate talks in Lima (COP20) have mostly gone smoothly, but important negotiating-team level discussions on a handful of key issues need to conclude this week so that there is wide agreement on the range of options facing the Ministers as they arrive early next week to pick up the high-level negotiations.

Negotiations are focussing in on critical elements including the nature of country pledges for the upcoming Paris agreement, pledges known as intended nationally determined contributions (INDCs). Countries will need clarity on the rules and format for these pledges as they are due to be delivered in the next 3-6 month. One key issue that Ministers must contend is the time period the pledges will cover.
“The timeframe issue is our key worry” explains Li Shuo from Greenpeace China. “A short commitment period would do a lot of good things but it hasn’t been discussed in an extensive manner. We learnt from the Kyoto Protocol that an 8-year period makes it very difficult to ratchet measures up as changes take place in the real world.

“In China, for example, things are changing fast, coal consumption is down 1-2% this year. The Marshall Islands have sent a very positive signal, arguing for a 5 year commitment period that can capture the most relevant and fresh circumstances in the real world. Countries will submit their INDCs early next year so we need to make progress over a short-term commitment period here in Lima ”

Discussions about what actions need to be taken to tackle climate change before 2020 have been noticeably absent from the negotiations so far. Although the The Paris Agreement is set to be reached in 2015, it won't kick-in until 2020, leaving unaddressed what action countries should take in the six years before then.

Shuo explained, “we are already approaching the end of the week and we are worried that we won’t have enough time to discuss this vital element of a draft Paris agreement. We need to ensure that countries are sufficiently prepared to capture the low hanging fruit. This is about securing short-term actions that countries can take that will form the basis for ongoing climate action.”

Negotiators also need to focus on how a Paris agreement would help countries affected by climate change adapt to the challenges that they face. A new UNEP report shows reveals that the cost of this adaptation could reach $150 billion by 2030, underlining how vitally important this aspect is.

“We believe there won’t be agreement in Paris if adaptation is not included in the draft of the agreement - most countries asking for it. Fortunately the talks are going smoothly and we are making progress on this issue”, said Tania Guillén from Centro Humboldt Nicaragua/SUSWATCH.

When ministers arrive for the high level negotiations next week will have to decide whether the current structure of the draft Paris agreement provides those suffering from climate impacts that are “locked-in” with enough support or whether a new mechanism needs to be established to compensate for loss and damage.

Many delegations are seeking for a clear pathway to ramp up financial and technological support. “We think that $10 billion already pledged by rich nations is not enough for vulnerable countries to deal with the impacts of climate change”, said Guillén.

Ministers also need to discuss the option of having an adaptation goal, an idea that really needs fleshing out. “They have to decide whether this will be part of the new agreement and whether it will be part of the INDCs. If adaptation is included within national climate action plans it will help to reinforce this vital pillar of the entire convention”.

With so much to do and, clearly, so much at stake, we are expecting a late night at the UN climate negotiations here in Lima.
 
-------
Climate Action Network (CAN) is a global network of over 900 NGOs working to promote government and individual action to limit human-induced climate change to ecologically sustainable levels. More at: www.climatenetwork.org

Contact:  Ria Voorhaar, CAN International in Lima on 963 961 813 or +49 157 3173 5568 or email: rvoorhaar@climatenetwork.org

Tags: 
Topics: 
Region: 

Varied visions for new climate agreement cause ripples in Lima

December 4, 2014, Lima, Peru: Progress in the UN climate negotiations continued to suffer from a failure to resolve deep seated differences of opinion between countries about key issues that should be covered by the comprehensive new agreement to deal with climate change, due to be signed in Paris at the end of next year.

The agreement is expected to signal the world’s first collective shift away from fossil fuels and towards renewable energy, but to ensure that the deal reaches it’s full potential, developing countries need to be supported to take their own climate action.

Mohamed Adow, senior climate advisor, for Christian Aid said countries wanted different outcomes from the Paris agreement.

“Some rich countries want an agreement heavy on self-driven mitigation actions, while developing countries, including most of the African countries want a comprehensive agreement that includes not just mitigation but also adaptation and finance,” Adow says.

“It feels like we're trying to land a helicopter in a storm. One of the ways to see the landing pad is to have a review process which ensures commitments are fair and adequate and are going to get us out of this mess. Once we get a review then countries will start to trust the process again,” Adow says.

Adow says a new paper outlining elements of the 2015 agreement is due on Friday.

“This needs to clearly lay out the options so that when ministers arrive next week they can see the decisions that need to be made here to keep us on the road to Paris.”

Climate finance is a hot issue here in Lima. Commitment to providing long-term climate finance is seen by many parties as a yardstick for measuring the willingness of richer countries to achieve a comprehensive climate agreement in Paris next year.

Alix Mazounie from Climate Action Network France says, “If we are serious about this, then the agreement should both provide public finance to help the poorest countries but also, help shift the trillions of dollars that are shaping today’s economy and opting for dirty energy.”

“The good news is: phase-down of fossil fuel subsidies and high-carbon investments are among the options listed in the current ADP text that parties are discussing this week. This needs to stay in and become a big piece of the Paris deal: fossil fuels are the contradiction in this process,” Mazounie says.

This element is vital to a fair agreement. Although rich nations like the USA and Japan have pledged to the Green Climate Fund they are shamelessly spending billions more to subsidise fossil fuel expansion. Last year, fossil fuel subsidies in the G20 increased rose from $37 to $88 billion, according to an Oil Change International and Overseas Development Institute Report.  

The money to finance a cleaner, fairer low carbon future is out there. But as long as rich countries continue to subsidise dirty energy expansion and fail to adequately support climate vulnerable countries, trust and progress at the UN climate negotiations will wane. 

-------

Climate Action Network (CAN) is a global network of over 900 NGOs working to promote government and individual action to limit human-induced climate change to ecologically sustainable levels. More at: www.climatenetwork.org

Contact:  Ria Voorhaar, CAN International in Lima on 963 961 813 or +49 157 3173 5568 or email: rvoorhaar@climatenetwork.org,  

Topics: 
Organization: 

Pages