Press Releases

CAN is an important, critical voice in the international climate policy process. The network’s regular press briefings and commentary help journalists and their audience make sense of what can be a baffling process, even to those who have been covering it for years.

CAN helps coordinate and amplify the communications work of its 850 members around major international climate processes. CAN also provides an important capacity building role for some members interested in boosting their communications efforts.

You can find a range of our latest resources and releases below:

International Media Briefing: Half way on the Road to Paris - where are we and where do we need to be

We are now almost half way through 2015, and climate change politics is heating up.  Ministers and Heads of State are meeting in various fora - from the G7 to the Petersberg Dialogue - to discuss the shape of the Paris agreement, countries are putting forward their national plans outlining how they'll move their economies away from fossil fuels, and people from all walks of life are preparing to take to the streets to show their support for scaling up climate action.  

Ahead of the UN climate negotiations getting underway on June 1, Climate Action Network experts will brief reporters on the state of play in international climate politics and what that means for the Bonn talks.

WhenThursday May 28th, 9am London  - 10am Berlin - 11am Addis Ababa - 1.30pm New Delhi - 4pm Beijing - 8pm Sydney.  You can check your timezone here. (In the Americas? Join the sister call by contacting PKnappenberger@climatenexus.org )

CAN members have also commented today on the outcome of the Petersberg Dialogue: read more here or see the Climate Chancellor in action here

Who: 

- Liz Gallagher, E3G
- Pierre Cannet, WWF France
- Li Shuo, Greenpeace China 

To Join:

You can join the teleconference online: here: www.uberconference.com/climateactionnetwork or dial the relevant telephone number for your country listed below and enter the conference number855-534-4477 followed by the # key when requested.

From the US or via Skype, dial (+1) 855-534-4477 - no PIN required. 
A full list of available telephone numbers can be found here: https://www.uberconference.com/international 

If your country is not listed, and you cannot join via internet browser, please contact us. 

Contact:
Ria Voorhaar, CAN International, email: rvoorhaar@climatenetwork.org, phone: +49 157 3173 5568

About CAN:
Climate Action Network (CAN) is a global network of over 900 NGOs working to promote government and individual action to limit human-induced climate change to ecologically sustainable levels. More at: www.climatenetwork.org

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Petersberg Dialogue reaffirms goal to phase out fossil fuel emissions, all eyes now on Merkel at the G7

Environment ministers from 35 countries met together with German Chancellor Angel Merkel and French President François Hollande as part of the Petersberg Climate Dialogue in Berlin today. The politicians discussed key points of the new, universal global climate agreement to be signed later this year in Paris. 
 
Today's meeting part of a series of high level meetings happening six months out from the Paris talks. These include the Business and Climate Summit happening in Paris this week and the G7 in Germany in June, at which many leading corporations and major economies respectively are expected to back a long term goal to phase out fossil fuel emissions as part of the Paris agreement. 
 
As anticipated, national climate plans (or Intended Nationally Determined Contributions) so far submitted by countries such as Canada, the EU, the US and others move us closer to, but not all the way to, a safe climate. We therefore need the G7 to support a Paris agreement that scales up action over time. A key tool that Paris can offer is a long term goal to phase out emissions and phase in renewable energy in conjunction with national plans that scale up over time to meet that goal. Achieving a that goal will require the leadership of both Merkel and Hollande. 
 
On the release of the Petersberg Dialogue statement, Climate Action Network members had the following comments:
 

Christoph Schott, Senior Campaigner at Avaaz in Germany, said:

The world needs climate superheroes, and the G7 could be Angela Merkel's moment to dust off her green cape and rise to the biggest challenge humankind has ever faced. The climate chancellor has been missing in action recently, but this summer she can inspire the world with 100% clean energy by 2050, something 2.3 million people want to see.

 
Martin Kaiser, head of international climate politics with Greenpeace, said:
 

German Chancellor Angela Merkel sent an important signal today when she reaffirmed the long term goal of global decarbonisation - a necessary first step for a global energy transition towards 100% renewable energy for all. However, this goal can and must be reached by 2050.  We must not delay it until the end of the century. We expect Merkel to now engage in the heated debate underway in Germany  by jump-starting a fair phase-out of coal in the country. Is she up to the task? The G7 Summit will be the defining last moment for Merkel to either establish herself as the 'coal chancellor' or the 'climate chancellor'.

 

Celia Gautier, EU policy advisor with RAC France, said:
 
For France to take the lead and secure an ambitious and durable agreement, it is crucial François Hollande step up climate action in France. France's energy transition is not fully under way. The country isn't even on track to meet its 2020 renewable energy target and French utilities are still massively investing in coal power plants abroad. This is not setting an example for the rest of the world. It's undermining France's capacity to stabilize climate change below 2°C. President Hollande has two hundred days left to clean up his act.
 
 
Contact:
Ria Voorhaar
Head - International Communications Coordination 
Climate Action Network – International (CAN)
 
mobile: +49 157 3173 5568
skype: ria.voorhaar
 

Letter to Prime Minister Shinzo Abe - CAN responds to Japan's draft INDC

CAN's 900 members wrote to Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe today, urging him to scale up his country's draft intended nationally determined contribution towards the Paris agreement. 

See attached and below.

 

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Dear Mr. Shinzo Abe,

On behalf of CAN, the largest network of NGOs working to keep the climate safe, I am writing to express concern from around the world in regard to the draft intended nationally determined contribution (INDC) towards the Paris agreement being considered by Japan. 

From its role in the forging of the Kyoto Protocol, to its commitment to Fast Start Finance, it can be said that Japan was a leader of climate action with a savvy and sophisticated economy geared to reap rewards from the efforts to address climate change. 

But those days now appear to be firmly in the past. Japan’s proposal, just announced today, to put forward at target of reducing emissions by around 26% on 2013 levels relegates it to that of a laggard on climate issues.  With this bare minimum target, Japan has not presented a credible plan to shift its economy from reliance on climate change-causing fossil fuels to renewable energy. This means the country will become increasingly exposed politically and economically to climate change.  Instead of putting forward a bold commitment, Japan has engaged with a slight of hand - changing base years - in an apparent attempt to make its offer look more appealing than it is. The world community is not fooled. 

By clinging to an outdated model of energy generation which gives utilities too much control and continuing to rely on inflexible nuclear and coal for “baseload” power, the country appears increasingly at odds with the momentum that is building towards a phase out of fossil fuels and the explosive growth in the renewable energy industry, even though it has all the ingredients to become a winner in a decarbonised world.  It is clear, Japan is being overtaken by key rivals, such as the US and China, on climate in advance of the Paris negotiations this December and who are standing ready to scoop up the benefits of accelerating the transition to renewable energy. By failing to send a strong message to the international community, Japan’s ideas on how to forge the Paris agreement will fall on deaf ears.

But it is not too late. Your government has the chance to review the draft and make a contribution that will unlock the benefits of action for the Japanese people and it’s economy. Therefore, ahead of the G7 meeting in Germany this June, CAN calls on Japan to set a target of over 40 per cent emissions reductions based on 1990 levels.  Only such a target will start to restore the country to a position of leadership on climate and spark the investment in renewable energy which the country’s people are calling for. 

Prime Minister Abe, we hope you hear this call and look forward to further exchange views on these issues.

Sincerely,

_____________

Wael Hmaidan 

Executive Director 

Climate Action Network-International - on behalf of its 900 NGO members.

 

 

 

気候行動ネットワーク・インターナショナル

2015年4月30日

 

日本の新しい温暖化対策の目標案について

 

安倍晋三 内閣総理大臣殿

 

我々、気候行動ネットワーク(CAN)は、気候変動を防ぐために活動するNGOの世界最大のネットワークです。私はCANを代表し、日本政府がパリ合意に向けて検討中の温暖化対策の目標案について世界中が懸念していることをお伝えしたいと思います。

これまで日本は、京都議定書の実現や途上国への短期資金支援の約束などでその役割を果たし、豊かで進んだ経済を活かして気候変動に対処する努力をすることで成果をあげようとしてきた、気候変動対策のリーダーであったと言えます。

ところが、それは過去のものとなったように見えます。日本が本日発表された「2013年比で温室効果ガス排出量を26%程度削減」という水準の目標案を提出すれば、気候変動問題における日本の地位は失墜してしまうでしょう。このような低い目標では、日本経済を化石燃料から再生可能エネルギー中心へと転換させることを計画していないということになります。このことは、日本が今後ますます、政治的にも経済的にも、気候変動の影響にさらされることになるということを意味します。意欲的な排出削減目標を打ち出すのではなく、基準年をずらすという奇策を用いて目標を実際よりも高く見せようとする意図は明らかです。国際社会は騙されません。

時代遅れの発電方法に執着し、「ベースロード」電源として原子力や石炭に頑なに依存し続ければ、日本は化石燃料の段階的削減や再生可能エネルギー産業の大幅な成長促進からますます乖離していきます。しかも、脱炭素化する世界において勝者となるために必要なものを日本が全て有しているのにもかかわらず、です。今年12月のパリに向けた交渉を前に、気候変動問題への対応において、日本は明らかに米国や中国といったライバルに遅れをとっています。それらの国々は今や再生可能エネルギーへの転換によってますます大きな便益を得ようとしています。国際社会に対し強いメッセージを送ることができなければ、パリ合意に対する日本の考えは、一切耳を傾けてもらえないことになるでしょう。

しかし、まだ間に合います。日本政府には、目標案を見直し、国民と日本経済のための便益となるような貢献をするチャンスがあります。ドイツで6月に開催されるG7サミットに向けて、CANは、日本が「1990年比で40%以上削減」を目標として掲げることを求めます。このような目標を掲げることによってはじめて、気候問題における日本のリーダーシップは回復し、日本国民が求めている再生可能エネルギーへの投資を飛躍させることができるでしょう。

安倍総理におかれましては、ぜひ私たちの要請を受け止めていただければ幸いです。そして、今後、気候変動や排出削減目標といったテーマについて安倍総理と意見交換ができますことを心より楽しみにしております。

 

敬具

_____________

Wael Hmaidan 

Executive Director 

Climate Action Network-International - on behalf of its 900 NGO members.

 

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Most Germans Support Plans for More Climate Protection and Less Brown Coal

Berlin, 25 April 2015 – A large majority of Germany's citizens support Chancellor Merkel and Economics Minister Gabriel in their plans for strengthening climate policy. Seventy percent are of the opinion that the German government should implement additional measures to ensure a 40% reduction in emissions by the year 2020 – a current target of German energy policy. This is the finding of a new survey conducted by TNS Emnid on behalf of the association Campact and WWF Germany.

Seventy-three percent of the more than 1000 German citizens who participated in the survey support the so-called “climate levy,” a proposed measure that would tax the oldest and dirtiest brown-coal-fired power plants. Majority support for the government's plans is even seen in impacted regions such as the Rheinland (69% support) and Brandenburg (55% support). Support was visible across party affiliations, with 75% of all participants in favor of the policy measure. The survey also makes clear that young people in particular favor a sustainable and forward-looking climate and energy policy.

"A clear majority wants to see a reduction in the use of brown coal for electricity production. This sends a clear signal to the German government: Mr. Gabriel, Mrs. Merkel, take action now. Ensure Germany fulfills its climate protection goals!" says Chris Methmann, a member of the association Campact.

Germany can only achieve its climate protection targets when significant emissions cuts are implemented in the electricity sector. The electricity sector is responsible for approx. 40% of German greenhouse gas emissions, half of which are attributable to brown-coal-fired power plants.

As the renewable energy revolution will create on the whole considerably more jobs than the measure to reduce the use of brown coal will destroy,  71% of Germans consider the policy measure to be justified, according to the TNS Emnid survey. Ninety percent of electricity generation would receive an explicit exemption from the proposed "climate levy." Accordingly, the policy measure represents an extremely modest intervention into the electricity sector.

"The support of the populace for the planned measure is overwhelming. In the run up to the G-7 meeting this summer and the UN Climate Conference in the fall, it is of key importance not to fall victim to the fear mongering that a few energy companies are engaged in," says Regine Günther, WWF Director for Climate and Energy.

 

Note regarding the survey: 
Unless otherwise indicated, all data were provided by TNS Emnid. 1002 adults took part in the survey, which took place between 18 and 20 April 2015. The results were weighted and are representative of the German population (age 14+).

Press contact:
Sylvia Ratzlaff, Press Office, WWF Germany, sylvia.ratzlaff@wwf.de, Tel. 030 311 777 467

Jörg Haas, Spokesperson, Campact e.V., haas@campact.de, Tel. 0152 - 22888799 
 
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Call for action: May and June Global climate mobilisation

This May and June, youth, faith leaders, and members of labour, development and justice organisations from across the world will call for the just transformation away from fossil fuels to be scaled up so that it can address our biggest problems - climate change, social inequality, unemployment and poverty.

We will stand side by side to ensure governments know that the people are demanding and driving action - we are building citizen-owned, locally based solutions, and strengthening a movement that will keep growing until we achieve a complete, just transition from fossil fuels to 100% renewable energy in citizens hands.

We call on all people to join together at this vital moment and to organize actions which showcase the right kind of decisions governments need to make to drive forward the people-powered transition to a world free of climate change, unsafe and dirty energy and inequality. Will government leaders support us actively in powering this transition or will they stand on the wrong side of history?

When

On the 30th and 31st of May the international mobilisation will be kicked off in France by Coalition Climat 21 with activities across the country. During those days, groups across the globe will be making the same demands and others will start of their activities leading into early June focusing on the G7 meetings in Germany as well as the UNFCCC session in Bonn.  These weeks will serve as a global launch of a year of action, being crucial to connect the dots of the amazing people power 2015 and beyond will witness.

How

The global call for climate action will take the message of the transition away from fossils and to renewables to the people with both boots on the ground and online activities. In France, actions, initiatives and demonstrations of all sizes will fill the cities. Other countries will see rallies in front of Parliaments, other direct actions, and citizen involvement at the G7 meetings. There will also be concerts that will gather audiences in the tens of thousands.

All of this will be backed by online activities, making it possible for people all around the world to voice their call for climate action/justice. We welcome all initiatives of all sizes across the world to join this moment, which can be done as an individual activity or as part of an already planned event. A website for registering events or joining forces with other groups will be available soon.    

Who

Numerous groups and coalitions will be carrying out activities of all shapes and sizes. To get a picture of what is going on, please have a look at THIS TIMELINE

For more information or suggestions, please contact Lasse Galvani Bruun

lbruun@climatenetwork.org | Skype: bruun.lasse | +55 11 99909 4046

 Study quantifies benefits unlocked by new climate action commitments

Scaling up action scales up benefits

Berlin, Germany. March 31, 2015: More jobs, fewer deaths and money saved from fuel imports. That’s what the climate action commitments laid out by the EU, US and China will deliver to their nations, according to a study by NewClimate Institute, and commissioned by Climate Action Network. 

The new study calculates that as well as helping reduce climate change risk, the steps outlined in the plans for these three economies will mean a total of almost 1 million new jobs by 2030, save the lives of around 113,000 people who will no longer die prematurely thanks to reduced air pollution, and huge savings from avoiding the high costs of imported fossil fuels. 

What’s more, scaling up their commitments to be in line with the transition to economies powered by 100% renewables by mid-century will mean unlocking even more benefits for these nations. More ambitious plans would collectively create around 3 million jobs by 2030, save the lives of around 2 million people who would otherwise fall victim to deadly air pollution, and would save around US$520 billion from avoided fossil fuel imports per year. If all countries took climate actions at this scale, global warming would not cross the 2degC threshold, beyond which scientists predict climate change to spin out of control. Such action would also give us an even chance of staying within 1.5degC - the threshold advocated by many of the most vulnerable nations. 

NewClimate Institute’s Niklas Höhne, author of the study, said: “This new analysis shows that any governments currently formulating climate action plans should consider the significant benefits for their people that could be achieved by setting their ambition levels to maximum.” 

Climate Action Network chair Mohamed Adow said: “Over 100 countries have thrown their support behind a phase out of fossil fuel emissions and it’s not hard to see why - making a just transition to 100% renewable energy is a no brainer as it means healthier economies and healthier people.” 

The report comes as developed countries - and others in a position to do so - were expected to lodge their offers with the UN by today. These offers will form the building blocks of a new climate agreement to be signed in Paris this December. 

The study shows that Europe stands to save around USD$33 billion per year on avoided fossil fuel imports through its climate action plan, but this would jump to around USD$170billion a year if the region scaled up its offer. 

China’s battle with air pollution has been well documented, as has the country’s actions to get it under control. Beijing’s new climate offer will save around 100,000 lives a year, but as they scale up their efforts that figure rises to around 1.2 million people annually. 

The United States is expected to formally lodge an offer with the UN today which will create around 470,000 jobs by 2030 in the country’s burgeoning renewable energy sector, with even more potential in the country’s energy efficiency sector. 

This study once again confirms key findings from last year's Fifth Assessment Report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which informed governments that the only way to build and retain prosperous economies is through both mitigating and adapting to climate change. 

All eyes will now turn to other major - more and more isolated - economies such as Japan, Australia and Canada whose governments appear to have missed today’s deadline for lodging climate action commitments with the UN.

With evidence piling up on the side of scaling up action and the multiple benefits that delivers, their people will increasingly question government decisions that fail to speed up the people-driven transition from fossil fuels to renewable energies.  

 

Notes to Editors

  1. The report, Assessing the missed benefits of countries’ national contributions, was written by the NewClimate Institute - which raises ambition for action against climate change and supports sustainable and climate-resilient development through research and analysis. 
  2. The report was commissioned by Climate Action Network - a global network of over 900 NGOs working to promote government and individual action to limit human-induced climate change to ecologically sustainable levels. More at: 
  3. You can find the full report here, a summary of the findings here, and an infographic here

 

Contact 
To be connected with a spokesperson on the report, please contact:  Ria Voorhaar, CAN International on +49 157 3173 5568 or email: rvoorhaar@climatenetwork.org  

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Europe becomes second party to lodge Paris climate action commitment

Climate Action Network released the following statement upon the release of Europe's commitment towards the Paris agreement on climate change today. 

European environment ministers have today agreed on the EU’s first climate action commitment towards the Paris agreement. The pledge translates its previously announced target to reduce carbon pollution by at least 40% by 2030. After Switzerland, the EU will be the second party in the world to lodge its plan to speed up the transition away from fossil fuels towards renewable energy with the UN. Commitments from other major countries including the United States and Mexico are expected later this month. Together, these pledges will signal the start of what will be the world’s first collective step on climate action. 

Europe has in many ways been spearheading the global transition, and it has only last week presented a domestic energy strategy that makes clear that Europe’s move towards a decarbonized economy is well underway. That’s why some observers want Europe’s first offer to go further in harnessing progress towards a fossil fuel phase out and Europe’s vision to be the world leader in renewable energy. For example, Denmark has already committed to make 100% of their electricity supply renewable and party leaders in the UK have committed to phase out coal. Accelerating this transition makes sense because it can deliver more and better jobs, improved public health and more robust economies.

Today’s announcement leaves open the tricky question of how to deal with forests when counting emission reductions. If not handled well, accounting rules could dilute the EU’s commitment. Progressive Member States are working to reach a decision that ensures environmental integrity and retains ambition. Furthermore, despite calling for countries to renew their pledges under the Paris agreement every five years, the EU does not outline a 2025 target in its offer.

The EU’s plan stayed silent on the amount of additional support they'd provide to developing countries who are expected to take their own climate action under the Paris agreement. Scaling up support will be vital if we're to secure a comprehensive global climate agreement in Paris in December that builds resilient communities and helps vulnerable people cope with unavoidable climate impacts. In a bid to shore up Europe’s leadership on climate, European foreign ministers can step up and explicitly outline their offer to help communities adopt renewable energy and adapt to climate change.

Undoubtedly, this offer will not be the final word from Europe on climate action towards the Paris agreement. Indeed, the EU’s pledge document says it looks forward to working with other countries to find “ways to collectively increase ambition further”. And European NGOs will continue to push member states to do more to unlock the “at least” part of their 2030 commitment.  The European Commission has already outlined plans to hold a conference in November to review collective commitments, providing the impetus for all countries to consider what more they can do to accelerate the transition away from fossil fuels. To give that agreement a smoother landing, Europe can reassert itself as a leader on climate diplomacy giving countries confidence in the collective steps we’re taking on climate action.

Contact: Ria Voorhaar
Head - International Communications Coordination 
mobile: +49 157 3173 5568

 
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EC kick starts 2015 climate pledge wave with draft proposal but more work ahead of Europe

Climate Action Network provided the following comment on the releasse of the EC's Energy Union package today. 

The European Commission has today published a proposal on how to flesh out the EU's commitment towards the Paris agreement on climate change as part of a package outlining Europe's vision for energy and climate issues. 

Building off it's previously announced target to reduce carbon pollution by at least 40% by 2030, the EC is the first party to attempt to translate its pledge for presentation to the UNFCCC after after last year's major climate negotiations in Lima gave countries guidance on the information to be presented.  While being the first off the mark is cause for applause, European NGOs will be working with EU member states to improve the transparency and quality of the EC's proposal before a version of it goes to the bloc's environment ministers next week. 

Moving forward, the EU will need to bring to life the "at least" part of their climate action commitment. Countries like Denmark have already committed to make 100% of their electricity supply renewable because they know that such policies can deliver more and better jobs, improved public health and more prosperous economies.  

The EC's draft proposal was silent on the amount of additional support they'd provide to developing countries who are expected to take their own climate action under the Paris agreement. Scaling up support will be vital if we're to secure a comprehensive global climate agreement in Paris in December that builds resilient communities and helps vulnerable people. Developing countries in particular will be looking for the EU to be more explicit in coming months on how it will help  communities adapt to climate change.

The EC's move today will kick off a wave of pledges from countries over the course of the year - all of which will add up to the first collective signal that the world is moving out of fossil fuels and embracing the renewable energy era.  All eyes will now turn to other developed countries who need to submit their commitments by the end of March.  The EC has also outlined plans to hold a review collective commitments in November providing the impetus for all countries to consider what more they can do to accelerate the transition away from fossil fuels on the eve of the Paris Climate Summit. 
 

Contact: 

Ria Voorhaar - +49 157 317 355 68, rvoorhaar @ climatenetwork.org 

UN climate talks in Geneva close adopting a draft text but much political work remains ahead

The UN climate talks in Geneva have closed today with an air of optimism having made progress towards a new agreement that is due to be signed in Paris at the end of the year. The draft agreement is on track to signal an end to fossil fuel emissions with both Jamaica and Switzerland adding their voices to the idea of a long term goal.1 

Climate Action Network members made the following comments on the closure of the UN session:

It's good news countries have given a stamp of approval for a new draft version of the climate agreement that will be the basis of negotiations through the year and that it features a wide range of options to deal with mitigation and to provide support to help developing countries prepare for climate impacts including a loss and damage mechanism.  

There's been a seachange in the dynamics here thanks to the open and consultative approach of the Co-Chairs.  Countries also came ready and willing to work.  The spirit of Geneva needs to be kept alive, as we move to on to deal with crunch issues like the need to scale up financial support for action and how to treat richer and poorer countries fairly, and loss and damage - which has the potential to be a make or break issue for Paris.  

Julie-Anne Richards, Climate Justice Programme  

All eyes must be on political leaders now, as they are the single most important influence that will shape the final outcome of a new global climate deal in Paris later this year.  

There are important political moments outside of the UN climate negotiation process – at both ministerial and Heads of State level - on the road to Paris where they can demonstrate their intentions, such as the G7, the G20 meetings, and the SDG Summit.

 The first test of political will and influence inside the negotiating process will come in the period from March to June when countries announce their plans to reduce emissions and, we hope, provide financial resources for the post-2020 period.

Tasneem Essop, WWF head of delegation to the UNFCCC

As the talks here in Geneva come to a close, people around the world are taking part in Global Divestment Day, a worldwide effort to move money out of the fossil fuel industry and into a clean energy future. 

That's what these negotiations need to do, as well: send a clear signal to investors that the age of fossil fuels is coming to an end.

Jamie Henn, Strategy and Communications Director. 350.org

1. CAN is calling for a complete phase out of fossil fuel emissions and the phase in of 100% renewable energy by 2050 with sustainable energy access for all. 

Media Briefing: From Geneva to Paris - what this week's talks mean for climate action in 2015

Civil society will assess what the outcome of the UN climate negotiations in Geneva this week means for progress towards a new climate agreement due to be signed in Paris this December. 

The talks conclude with momentum for a phase out of fossil fuel emissions growing across the board, and campaigns like those calling for people and institutions to withdraw their money from dirty energy companies gaining ground with divestment events taking place in 58 countries.

From Geneva, negotiators will return to capitals where governments are busy preparing their climate action commitments towards the Paris agreement before they meet again in Bonn in June for talks to resume.

When: Friday February 13th, 2pm Geneva time which is 8am New York/5pm Dubai/ 1pmGMT

Where: Room XXIII (23), Building E, Level 1, UN Palais Des Nations, Geneva or join online.

To Join: You can join the teleconference online here: www.uberconference.com/climateactionnetwork or dial the relevant telephone number for your country listed below and enter the conference number: 855-534-4477 followed by the # key when requested.

From the US or via Skype, dial (+1) 855-534-4477 - no PIN required. A full list of available telephone numbers can be found here: https://www.uberconference.com/international 

If your country is not listed, and you cannot join via internet browser, please contact us. 

Contact: Ria Voorhaar, CAN International, email: rvoorhaar@climatenetwork.org, phone: +49 157 3173 5568

About CAN: Climate Action Network (CAN) is a global network of over 900 NGOs working to promote government and individual action to limit human-induced climate change to ecologically sustainable levels. More at: www.climatenetwork.org

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