Fossil of the Day Awards - Bonn - June 11, 2011

Japan wins first place fossil and the second place fossil goes to, Well, We Aren’t
Sure.

 
First Place Fossil is awarded to Japan. Today Japan reiterated their position of
supporting the inclusion of nuclear facilities to CDM. Today, June 11th, the three-
month anniversary since the tragic earthquake and the Fukushima nuclear disaster,
saw thousands of Japanese people demonstrating against nuclear energy in more than
100 cities all across Japan.  It is hard to believe that Japan has not changed its position
of including nuclear facilities into CDM, even after this tragic event. We urge Japan
to listen to its own people and come up with a new position right away. Japan can
actually lead the discussion and persuade others to exclude nuclear from the CDM!
 
The second placed fossil goes to...well we aren't exactly sure.  Flying in the face of
enhanced NGO participation, an important focus of this session, and the mantra of
transparency, 'an unknown Party or group of Parties' approached the Chair to block
the valiant efforts of Ambassador De Alba to open the LCA informal on legal issues
on Friday afternoon.  Not only do we need fair, ambitious and legally binding efforts
to save our dear planet, those discussions should take place in an open and transparent
manner.  Just as we have supported the call for Parties not intending to commit to a
second commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol to come clean with their intentions,
we expect the same level of transparency with respect to legally binding intentions
under the LCA - and that starts with opening the informal to observers.  For your non-
transparent ways, this Party or group of Parties gets an Anonymous Fossil. Is anyone
willing to accept the award?
 
 
About CAN: The Climate Action Network (CAN) is a worldwide network of roughly
700 Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) working to promote government and
individual action to limit human0induced climate change to ecologically sustainable
levels. www.climatenetwork.org   
 
About the fossils: The Fossil of the Day awards were first presented at the climate
talks in 1999, in Bonn, initiated by the German NGO Forum. During United Nations
climate change negotiations (www.unfccc.int), members of the Climate Action
Network (CAN), vote for countries judged to have done their 'best' to block progress
in the negotiations in the last days of talks.  

 
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A fossil hat trick for Canada at the UN climate talks: if only the 'other' Canucks had such luck

First Place Fossil is awarded to Canada. Guess what sector is Canada’s fastest-growing source of greenhouse gas emissions? That would be the tar sands, where emissions from digging up dirty oil have close to tripled since 1990.

Now guess which sector Canada decided not to report on in its most recent National Inventory Report? Yes, that would be the tar sands again...How could Canada’s government leave out such a crucial sector, you may ask? Well, when Canadian journalists did some digging, they found that tar sands emissions were higher than ever last year. We can’t let Canada’s oil-loving government slide off the hook for that little slip-up. For their tarry approach to transparency, we award Canada today’s first place fossil.

Canada also takes the Second Place Fossil. We’ve all seen it coming, but now Canada has made it official: they’re not willing to take a legally binding target under a second phase of Kyoto. Of course, it’s not like Canada contributed much to the first phase of Kyoto — their decision to walk away without even trying to hit their target puts them at the bottom of the Kyoto class.

The harsh truth? Canada’s track record of climate inaction shows that they need a binding target more than anyone. For failing to recognize that, and undermining this process in the process, we award Canada a second place fossil.

Third Place Fossil Goes to…Canada. While appreciating Canada's cajones (that is "courage" in Spanish) to make a presentation at today's mitigation workshop, the refusal to acknowledge what everyone else in Bonn knows has earned Canada today's
3rd place fossil.  For a long time it has been clear that Canada will not meet it's Kyoto target, yet in response to repeated questions this morning the best Canada could offer was that they could not possibly know until the end of the true up period in 2014. Canada must have its head stuck in the tar sands of Alberta.

About CAN: The Climate Action Network (CAN) is a worldwide network of roughly 700 Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) working to promote government and individual action to limit human0induced climate change to ecologically sustainable levels. www.climatenetwork.org  

About the fossils: The Fossil of the Day awards were first presented at the climate talks in 1999, in Bonn, initiated by the German NGO Forum. During United Nations climate change negotiations (www.unfccc.int), members of the Climate Action Network (CAN), vote for countries judged to have done their 'best' to block progress in the negotiations in the last days of talks.

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United States Awarded First Place Fossil of the Day, Papua New Guinea Receives Second Place Fossil

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                                                          8 June 2011

The first place Fossil of the Day Award goes to the United States of America. This fossil is awarded for opposing a discussion of sources of long-term finance in the LCA.  Secretary Clinton herself pledged to work with other countries to jointly mobilize $100 billion per year by 2020 for climate action in developing countries.  Meeting that commitment has to start with exploring options of innovative sources of public finance in the UNFCCC.  The US must be open to a process under the LCA to at least start the conversation.

Papua New Guinea receives the second place Fossil. This award goes to PNG for saying Tuvalu did not have enough trees to be entitled to have an opinion on REDD or advocate for the rights of indigenous peoples. PNG has shown it is far removed from the reality of its Pacific island neighbours in terms of REDD.  PNG's response to Tuvalu's call for transparency was tacky to say the least and reflects  its ignorance of the 'Pacific Way'.  Tuvalu took a principled position in supporting the interests of indigenous peoples - whether that is in the interest of Tuvalu is not the issue, as countries should not only defend their national interests but also global ones.

About CAN: The Climate Action Network (CAN) is a worldwide network of roughly 700 Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) working to promote government and individual action to limit human0induced climate change to ecologically sustainable levels. www.climatenetwork.org  

About the fossils: The Fossil of the Day awards were first presented at the climate talks in 1999, in Bonn, initiated by the German NGO Forum. During United Nations climate change negotiations (www.unfccc.int), members of the Climate Action Network (CAN), vote for countries judged to have done their 'best' to block progress in the negotiations in the last days of talks.

###
Contact:
David Turnbull
dturnbull@climatenetwork.org
USA: +12023163499
Germany: +49(0)2523657307
 

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RAY OF THE DAY Award - AOSIS


Bonn, Germany, June 7, 2011

The Climate Action Network (CAN), a coalition of over 600 NGOs worldwide, gives out the 'Ray of The Day' award to the countries who are a ray of hope over the past days of negotiations at the UN climate change conference.

The awards given out on June 7, 2011 in Bonn, Germany were as follows:

The Ray of the Day to AOSIS for their spirit of constructive participation. They provided a concrete proposal to move the KP negotiations forward particularly in light of the decidedly uninspiring progress elsewhere. We would like to encourage other parties or groups to follow the example AOSIS has set in being solutions oriented. As AOSIS reminded us today, we cannot afford to talk in circles when there is so much to lose.
 

Fossil of the Day Awards - Bonn - June 6, 2011

FOSSIL OF THE DAY AWARDS
Bonn, Germany, June 6, 2011

The Climate Action Network (CAN), a coalition of over 600 NGOs worldwide, gives out two 'Fossil of The Day' awards to the countries who perform the worst during the past days negotiations at the UN climate change conference.

The awards given out on June 6, 2011 in Bonn, Germany were as follows:

First place fossil goes to Saudi Arabia for using their pet issue of response measures to thwart the urgent need for progress.
 
The Saudi’s brought the SBI to a halt by reneging on the Bali Action Plan and the Cancun Agreements which clearly separate response measures from adaptation, seeking to hold the entire process hostage to its oily self interest.  
 
As the world struggles to feed itself, island nations are faced with threats to their survival and scientists’ revelations that the arctic is melting faster than expected – now is not the time to revert to old, discredited tactics to block progress.

About the fossils:

The Fossil-of-the-day awards were first presented at the climate talks in 1999, also in Bonn, initiated by the German NGO Forum.

During United Nations climate change negotiations (www.unfccc.int), members of the Climate Action Network (CAN), a worldwide network of over 600 non-governmental organisations, vote for countries judged to have done their 'best' to block progress in the negotiations in recent days of talks.

www.climatenetwork.org

 

Japan Takes 1st Place Fossil of the Day for KP Attack, U.S. Scores 2nd and 3rd

8 December 2010

Cancun, Mexico – Japan earned a 1st place Fossil for its continued efforts to kill the
Kyoto Protocol by preventing a second commitment period from moving forward.
The United States, fresh off its first, and 1st place, Fossil in Cancun yesterday, earned
its first 2nd and 3rd place Fossils for slowing technology transfer and developing
country adaptation support.

The Fossils as presented read:
"The United States wins the 3rd place Fossil. Congratulations US - Technology
transfer has been a core commitment since the beginning of the Convention, and
we’ve already wasted too much time discussing how to do it. A workable proposal is
finally on the table and everyone else is willing to go with it and establish the new
technology mechanism here in Cancun. But yesterday, you made it clear that in your
view, the Parties should only ‘consider’ establishing it.

That’s strange, given that the Copenhagen Accord clearly states that leaders agreed to
‘establish a Technology Mechanism’, ‘operational immediately’. We are surprised
you are going back behind what heads of state already agreed to and try to renegotiate
a deal struck a deal struck among world leaders. For the last year, most parties in the
technology negotiations have been working hard to answer the remaining questions
and a lot of progress was made in Cancun. While everyone else is being flexible, your
obstructionism is blocking any progress.

The US championed the need for a technology center and network and you are
developing some regional center pilots, so why the heartburn on the proposal on the
table? Concerns by US clean tech companies about being under a burdensome and
bureaucratic UN body are misinformed; what our warming world needs is precisely
what a multilateral mechanism can deliver: coordinated planning and implementation
to speed-up and scale-up the what poor countries and communities need to transition
quickly to a low-emissions future."

"The USA wins the 2nd place Fossil for delaying agreement on the establishment of
an Adaptation Committee, which is demanded by developing countries to improve
coherence and coordination of adaptation under the Convention. The US continues to
insist on clarification of the functions and asked in Cancun whether this could not be
dealt with under SBSTA, an approach which they had rejected some years ago when
it was on the SBSTA agenda. The Convention process requires a dedicated
institutional arrangement on adaptation which can initiate further action, not limited to
technical advice. This function cannot be fulfilled by existing institutions outside the
Convention."

"The 1st place Fossil goes to Japan. Although the Minister arrived on Sunday, Japan
has not yet changed its position of rejecting to put its target for the second
commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol, which virtually kills the future of the
Kyoto Protocol. Despite the plea from all around the world, even in the midst of the
isolation (with hidden allies consisting of Russia and Canada), Japan's inflexibility
endangers the whole discussion of the future framework at CANCUN, which the earth
desperately needs."

_______________________________________
About CAN: The Climate Action Network is a worldwide network of roughly 500
Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) working to promote government and
individual action to limit human-induced climate change to ecologically sustainable
levels. www.climatenetwork.org


About the fossils: The Fossil of the Day awards were first presented at the climate
talks in 1999  in Bonn, initiated by the German NGO Forum. During United Nations
climate change negotiations (www.unfccc.int), members of the Climate Action
Network (CAN), vote for countries judged to have done their 'best' to block progress
in the negotiations in the last days of talks.

 

Region: 
Related Member Organization: 

Packed Fossil Ceremony Features 3 Fossils, Colossal Fossil, Ray of the Day

Cancun, Mexico – The United States took another 1st place Fossil on the last regular
night of Fossil of the Day awards in these United Nations negotiations, but with
strong competition from several other countries, and the overall worst country award,
the Colossal Fossil, going to its neighbor to the north, Canada, renamed “Can’t”nada
for the night. The United States held major pieces of the negotiations hostage waiting
for developing countries to agree to verify their pollution reductions, Russia further
endangered the Kyoto Protocol’s Second Commitment Period, and Venezuela and
Saudi Arabia teamed up to block a report on innovative sources of climate financing.

Mexico’s performance shone much brighter, exhibiting transparency and fortitude in
moving the negotiations forward, earning it a Ray of the Day in the first major climate
negotiations taking place in its own country, and scoring only the second, and likely
final, Ray of these negotiations.

The Fossils and Ray of the Day, as presented, read:
"Venezuela and Saudi Arabia receive the 3rd place Fossil for blocking a report on
innovative sources of financing for climate action, in the finance group of the LCA.
The report of the Secretary General’s Advisory Group on Climate Change Finance
(AGF Report) is a treasure trove of ideas and analyses of innovative sources of public
financing that can support developing countries with urgently needed adaptation and
emissions reductions actions. Perhaps Venezuela and the Saudis don’t realize that
there are developing countries elsewhere in the world that can’t count on oil exports
to pay for their luxuries and meet the needs of their people.
 

The report may not be perfect, but if parties start from scratch next year looking at
financing sources without input from this report, they may have to reinvent the wheel
and it could hold delay progress for years, if these same countries use all the tricks at
their disposal to disrupt progress."

"Russia earns the 2nd place Fossil. Oh, what a miserable year to be Russia. From
severe heat to dust storms raising awareness of climate impacts, it was a tough year
for anyone wanting to avoid cutting their greenhouse gas pollution. But, you managed
to pull it off, endangering the Kyoto Protocol by failing to inscribe your pledges under
the KP text. For that, you get a 2nd place Fossil and our continued shame."
"The United States of America earns the 1st place Fossil. The Fossil goes to the US
for blocking important text to ensure effective accounting measures for developed
country emissions targets. The US has held hostage all the other building blocks to an
agreement in MRV/ICA. Its refusal to accept good accounting measures for its own
(highly inadequate) actions is ironic and hypocritical."

"Canada wins the Colossal Fossil for the year. In Fossil terms, today’s winning
country is building a dynasty. Day in and day out, it gives 110% in the battle for fossil
supremacy. It blocks, avoids, delays, and fakes -- and its emissions simply never stop
growing. Its tar sands sector is truly among the global elite, an all-star of greenhouse
gas pollution. Please welcome the New York Yankees of Fossils (or as we say in
Canada, the Montreal Canadians): 2010’s Colossal Fossil is the country we’ve come
to know as “Can’t”nada. This is Canada’s fourth Fossil victory in as many years. So
despite an overall record of climate futility, Canadians should rest assured  there’s at least one thing here that Canada is really, really good at."

"Mexico earns a Ray of the Day. As we saw in Copenhagen, transparency is not a
given in the UNFCCC process, although it’s supposed to be. Nor is intransigence a
requirement, although we see it much too often.
 

The role of a successful host country is to avoid these pitfalls and push Parties toward
a good and mutually agreed outcome, not just to save face, but to truly advance the
process. Mexico showed this and more, deeply involving itself in leadership of the
negotiations and demonstrating fortitude in the face of countries many thought could
never agree. For good process and transparency, strength, and perseverance, your
leadership earns you only the second Ray of the Day awarded in your home city."
_____________________________________________________________________
About CAN: The Climate Action Network is a worldwide network of roughly 500
Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) working to promote government and
individual action to limit human-induced climate change to ecologically sustainable
levels. www.climatenetwork.org

About the fossils: The Fossil of the Day awards were first presented at the climate
talks in 1999  in Bonn, initiated by the German NGO Forum. During United Nations
climate change negotiations (www.unfccc.int), members of the Climate Action
Network (CAN), vote for countries judged to have done their 'best' to block progress
in the negotiations in the last days of talks. The Ray of the Day, a newer award,
honors countries that have done something exceptional to move the negotiations
forward.

 

 

Related Member Organization: 

Daryl Hannah Presents First Ray of the Day and 3 Fossils Awarded Too - Canada Takes 1st Place... Yet Again

Cancun, Mexico – Canada once again took the 1 place Fossil of the Day today at the United Nations climate negotiations, this time for calling the idea that the biggest polluters should take on the biggest pollution reductions a “side car” issue. This is Canada’s sixth Fossil in Cancun. Papua New Guinea won its first Fossil, coming in 2nd place, for watering down environmental and social safeguards in a potential REDD forest protection agreement. The United States earned a Fossil for the third day in a row, this time for blocking progress on a host of issues unless developing countries
took on more commitments.

On a positive note, a large bloc of the countries most harmed by climate change impacts, especially sea level rise, earned the firs Ray of the Day at the Cancun negotiations for putting the reference to the safe upper limit to temperature rise, 1.5° Celsius, back in the negotiating text.

The Fossils and Ray of the Day, as presented, read:

“The United States of America wins the 3rd place Fossil. UK weather forecasts warn that Christmas could be canceled due to a once-in-a-lifetime cold front coming from the North, but it seems a similar cold front has already arrived from Washington. US officials indicated today that they won’t allow movement on adaptation, capacity building or technology until developing countries move more on MRV and Mitigation to keep them happy. Throwing up such roadblocks to progress is at odds with what Ambassador Stern said himself, 'Let's not do nothing...Let's not be hung up for year after year after year.'

Yet nothing but blocking and blaming appears to be all that the world may get from the US here in Cancun. The deal back in Bali agreed by the previous US President, George W. Bush, was that the US would cut its emissions and provide finance and technology. In fact, that’s pretty much the deal agreed to almost two decades ago by his father!

The world expects even more from President Obama, who only a year ago was
awarded a Nobel Peace Prize for his potential to contribute to multilateral
cooperation, including cooperation on climate.

No one wants to give another lump of coal to the country we all need for a truly global climate solution. So let’s make this the last one we ever give to the US and use it to fire up their delegation to put the 'Yes We Can' into Cancun!"

"Papua New Guinea earns the 2nd place Fossil. In their desperation to get a REDD agreement at all costs, Parties have been pushing for weaker and weaker text almost on a daily basis. The implementation of the social, environmental and governance safeguards is just about at rock bottom. Some countries want no mechanism that would guarantee compliance, and instead proposed a weak system to 'monitor and inform' how the safeguards are addressed, but for PNG, even that was too strong!

PNG has now proposed to weaken the text even further to simply establish a process to only share information - with no actual obligation to do so. And we all know how poor PNG is at sharing information. We must ask - share with who? Themselves perhaps! We hope our friends in PNG will share with the world what's going on behind the scenes in their country especially with carbon cowboys riding into town stealing local peoples land and rights. So for that clanger, a fossil to PNG."

“The 1st place Fossil goes to Canada. In a briefing with journalists this morning, Canada’s environment minister dismissed the principle of historical responsibility as a ‘sidecar’ issue.

That’s a pretty convenient stance for a country in the top tier of cumulative
greenhouse gas emitters. But maybe it’s not surprising that Canada considers
historical responsibility as nothing more than a distracting side issue — after all, this is the same government that decided Kyoto targets were optional.

With that kind of attitude, it’s not surprising that the rest of world has started to consider Canada a ‘sidecar’ country. And Canada’s current government seems to be more concerned about getting oil into the tank than about the safety of the passengers.”

"The Alliance of Small Island States, Small Island Developing States, and Least Developed Countries win the first Ray of the Day in Cancun, and what a bright one it is! Returning the reference to 1.5 degrees C in the Shared Vision text is crucial for shining some light on the line between survival and destruction for some nations. For keeping our attention, and the text, on what matters most, AOSIS, the SIDS, and the LDCs earn a Ray of the Day."
_____________________________________________________________________
About CAN: The Climate Action Network is a worldwide network of roughly 500
Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) working to promote government and
individual action to limit human-induced climate change to ecologically sustainable levels. www.climatenetwork.org

About the fossils: The Fossil of the Day awards were first presented at the climate talks in 1999 in Bonn, initiated by the German NGO Forum. During United Nations climate change negotiations (www.unfccc.int), members of the Climate Action Network (CAN), vote for countries judged to have done their 'best' to block progress in the negotiations in the last days of talks. The Ray of the Day, a newer award, honors countries that have done something exceptional to move the negotiations forward.

Related Member Organization: 

U.S. and EU Each Win 1 Fossil in Cancun, Canada Takes 2nd Place Again

Cancun, Mexico – The United States earned the 1 place Fossil of the Day, and its
first Fossil of the United Nations climate negotiations here, for trying to hide mention
of pollution reduction targets it is not on track to meet, not just for itself, but for all
developed countries. Canada won its fifth Fossil, and second 2nd place Fossil, for
literally inventing anti-coal regulation it does not have. The European Union, with a
3rd place Fossil and its first in Cancun, received the award for doing nothing to
address excess allowed emissions and then using that excess as a reason for not
wanting to continue the Kyoto Protocol. Canada remains the leading recipient of
Fossils in Cancun.


The Fossils as presented read:


"The European Union wins the 3rd place Fossil. For not engaging on specific tabled
solutions dealing with the AAU surplus (hot air), which threatens the environmental
integrity of the Kyoto protocol while at the same time using the lack of environmental
integrity as a condition to sign on to a second commitment period under the Kyoto
Protocol. Europe, get your act together!"


“Canada wins the 2nd place Fossil. It must be wonderful to live in the magical world
of Canada’s Environment Minister. In that enchanted land, a press release is the same
as a law, and ‘polluting for up to 45 more years’ means the same thing as ‘banning
dirty coal.’


Tragically, the rest of us are stuck with reality. And in reality, it’s a problem to tell
your Parliament and your media that you’ve published regulations to ban coal when
you’ve done nothing of the kind.For that little vacation from the truth, Canada takes home yet another Fossil of the Day.


"The United States wins the 1st place Fossil. After more than a week of relative
silence, the U.S.A. roared back to life in a most unfortunate way this morning. It
opposed reference to aggregate pollution reduction targets for developed countries of
25-40% from 1990 levels by 2020 in the 1.b.i. drafting group. Just because the U.S. is
not on track to make these necessary cuts is no excuse for obscuring the fact that it
and other developed countries need to get there. For trying to hide the obvious, the
U.S. wins the first place Fossil."
_____________________________________________________________________
About CAN: The Climate Action Network is a worldwide network of roughly 500
Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) working to promote government and
individual action to limit human-induced climate change to ecologically sustainable
levels. www.climatenetwork.org


About the fossils: The Fossil of the Day awards were first presented at the climate
talks in 1999  in Bonn, initiated by the German NGO Forum. During United Nations
climate change negotiations (www.unfccc.int), members of the Climate Action
Network (CAN), vote for countries judged to have done their 'best' to block progress
in the negotiations in the last days of talks.

Topics: 

Canada Takes 1st Place Fossil of the Day for Supporting a “Zombie” Kyoto

Cancun, Mexico – Canada earned the 1 place Fossil of the Day for only supporting
the continuation of the Kyoto Protocol if it didn’t have to take on any pollution
reduction commitments for itself. This is Canada’s fourth Fossil, and second 1st place
Fossil, at the Cancun negotiations. On Monday, it took all three Fossils for a year
spent weakening its greenhouse gas reduction efforts. Canada currently has earned the
most Fossils of any country in the Cancun climate change talks.

The text of the award reads:

“Canada earns the 1st place Fossil. Yesterday we learned two things about Canada and
Kyoto:
• The UNFCCC Executive Secretary named Canada as one of the countries not
willing to commit to a second phase of Kyoto here in Cancun
• A Canadian negotiator told Climate Action Network Canada that ‘no one is
trying to kill Kyoto.’

To you and me, that might sound like a contradiction. But upon investigation, it
turned out that Canada is perfectly happy to see Kyoto continue — it just shouldn’t
have any targets in it. In other words, the patient isn’t dead: she’s just had her heart
removed. This chilling vision of a ‘zombie Kyoto’ earns Canada a first place Fossil.”

 

About CAN: The Climate Action Network is a worldwide network of roughly 500
Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) working to promote government and
individual action to limit human-induced climate change to ecologically sustainable
levels. www.climatenetwork.org

About the fossils: The Fossil of the Day awards were first presented at the climate
talks in 1999  in Bonn, initiated by the German NGO Forum. During United Nations
climate change negotiations (www.unfccc.int), members of the Climate Action
Network (CAN), vote for countries judged to have done their 'best' to block progress
in the negotiations in the last days of talks.

 

Topics: 
Region: 

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