Tag: G20

German G20 must mobilise action on climate change for a stronger and safer world

Germany today took over the G20 Presidency by outlining its mission for 2017 under the overarching motto of “Shaping an Interconnected World”

1 December 2016:  Climate Action Network calls on the German Presidency to use the G20 platform to mobilise international cooperation and action on climate change. 
Decisive action on climate change is vital to strengthening global stability and achieving sustainable development, two pillars of the 2017 G20 agenda. The G20 countries account for nearly 80 percent of global emissions. They have a responsibility to lead on several actions to ensure that climate change does not further endanger global stability.  

By making climate-risk disclosure mandatory, the G20 can ensure that new investment in infrastructure is climate-resilient and low carbon. This is vital to avoid the serious risk of stranded assets that threaten financial stability and economic growth. 

Inefficient fossil fuel subsidies skew markets in favour of energy sources that are not environmentally sustainable and which fail to deliver long-term energy security. 
G20 governments must unlock the potential of renewable energy sources that are now cost-competitive in many parts of the world. They must further commit to halt fossil-fuel based development and infrastructure investments. Green finance will be an essential enabling element in the necessary global energy transition to 100% renewable energy.

Developing mid-century strategies for sustainable development and decarbonization is a key step in ensuring stable and resilient national economies. Such long-term planning will send clear signals to the private sector, and help build a framework for investments in line with development goals and those of the Paris Agreement.

Mitigating and adapting to climate change will be key to global security as the scale and frequency of extreme weather events threaten vulnerable communities and exacerbate scarcity of natural resources. 
In 2015, all G20 governments adopted the Paris Agreement and Agenda 2030-the Sustainable Development Goals. During COP 22 in Marrakech last month, 48 of the most vulnerable countries committed to transitioning to 100% renewable energy by 2050. 
Now the world’s largest economies must ensure that their economic decisions are compatible with the commitments they made in Paris and in line with the direction in which the global economy is moving.

Germany, at the helm of the G20 must reaffirm commitments to avoid irreversible climate change. It must through its G20 leadership, work to ensure a progressive outcome on global climate action.    

CAN members comment on the start of the German G20 Presidency  

“Climate science tells us that the responsible thing to do is to stop building new fossil fuel infrastructure now. Germany should push the G20 in this direction, and at the very least, should advance the 2009 G20 promise to end fossil fuel subsidies. We can’t afford to build new fossil fuel infrastructure, and we certainly can’t afford to waste even one more cent of public money on it.” Alex Doukas, Senior Campaigner, Oil Change International

“As the G20 Presidency enters Europe for the next 12 months, Germany and the whole European Union should get behind an ambitious work plan that moves the world's largest economies further away from fossil fuels and closer towards being fully renewables based and energy efficient. Germany together with the rest of the EU now have the opportunity to solidify their alleged climate leadership. This includes phasing out fossil fuel subsidies, increasing near-term climate action and getting down to business with the EU's long-term decarbonisation strategy.” Wendel Trio, Director, Climate Action Network Europe

“As the world’s largest emitters and strongest economies, the G20 have a responsibility to act on climate change. The Paris Agreement has set a globally agreed framework for responding to the climate crisis, but we can only achieve the Paris objectives if the G20 now acts decisively on implementation. We welcome the emphasis the German presidency has announced to put on this issue. We expect chancellor Merkel to make it very clear that climate change has to be a priority, also vis-a-vis the incoming U.S. administration. All G20 countries need to agree to develop their mid-century decarbonization plans by 2018.” Christoph Bals, Policy Director, Germanwatch     

For more information, contact Dharini Parthasarathy, Communications Coordinator, Policy, CAN- International; email: dparthasarathy@climatenetwork.org, or call on +32468405277

About Climate Action Network:
Climate Action Network (CAN) is a global network of over 1200 NGOs working to promote government and individual action to limit human-induced climate change to ecologically sustainable levels. www.climatenetwork.org

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CAN Statement on the 2016 G20 Summit: A strong take-off , but a bumpy landing on climate change

Hangzhou, China, 5 September 2016: Climate Action Network welcomed the US and China’s ratification of the Paris Agreement on the eve of the G20 summit here. However, civil society groups are disappointed that more countries did not follow suit.  Moreover, the final G20 communique published today was overall low on details, weak in tone and failed to make strong commitments on fighting climate change.

The communique failed to make significant progress on several of CAN demands communicated to the G20 governments

  • Though there were references to sustainable development, there was no mention of countries submitting their long-term strategies and decarbonisation plans.
  •  The summit failed to set a deadline to end fossil fuel subsidies.
  •  While looking forward to outcomes from the forthcoming Montreal Protocol and the ICAO meetings, the communique was weakly worded and did not commit to reaching an ambitious agreement on either of these meetings.
  • While stressing commitments to scale up green finance, the G20 failed to mention the need for climate-related financial disclosures or to ensure that future infrastructures would be climate-friendly and pro-poor.
  • No plans were outlined on transitioning to 100 percent renewable energy. 

Some of CAN members reacted to the outcome of the summit as below:

“Hosts to this year’s G20, China has shown great leadership on climate over the last year. Against a backdrop of declining coal consumption and rapid renewable energy growth, China has even greater potential now to match its political effort with further action...but the lack of progress on outlining a concrete timetable for the phasing out of fossil fuel subsidies is a reminder that the G20’s collective action on climate change must go further. Handing out money to the fossil fuel industry is simply not compatible with the Paris Agreement,” said Li Shuo, Greenpeace East Asia’s Senior Climate Policy Adviser.

"The Paris Agreement and the SDGs have set a new framework for the global economy and the G20 can't continue with business as usual if these goals are to be put into practice. Discussions started on these issues this year, but much more needs to be done. We commend China for putting the ratification of the Paris Agreement and the greening of the financial system on the G20 agenda - it is now up to the German presidency next year to deliver concrete implementation strategies on these issues. The United States and China formally joining the Paris Agreement is a big step, as it shows that the course set by the Paris Agreement is becoming irreversible. It also increases the pressure for all EU governments to follow suit if they don't want to be left out," said Christoph Bals, Policy Director, Germanwatch

“The G20 failed to set the right priorities. They don’t seem to care for our common home. While climate change is only one of "Further Significant Global Challenges Affecting the World Economy”, the biggest problem and – at the same time – the one-size-fits-all solution G20 offers to these challenges is growth. They stick to the same old tools that have not been able to solve the climate crisis and global inequality,” said Pirmin Spiegel, General Director at the Catholic Bishops' Organisation for Development Cooperation MISEREOR

CAN believes it is imperative that the world’s most powerful economies, accounting for up to 80 percent of global emissions, take a strong lead to limit the increase in the global temperature beyond 1.5C above pre-industrial levels, as committed under the Paris Agreement; end fossil fuel subsidies; and submit long-term decarbonisation plans, among other actions.
By missing out on an opportunity to consolidate the international community’s commitment to fighting climate change, two months before the COP22 in Marrakesh, the G20 has failed to build on momentum and ambition towards a post-Paris climate agenda commensurate with the challenges facing our planet.

Contact:
For more information, contact Dharini Parthasarathy, Communications Coordinator, Policy, CAN International 
Email: dparthasarathy@climatenetwork.org or call +918826107830

More resources:
Open letter to G20 countries 
CAN Briefing: G20 Key Demands 
G20 Communique- English

About Climate Action Network:

Climate Action Network (CAN) is a global network of over 950 NGOs working to promote government and individual action to limit human-induced climate change to ecologically sustainable levels. www.climatenetwork.org

 

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Open Letter to G20 Govenments

In 2015, the world took a historic step in the fight to tackle climate change. In adopting the Paris Agreement, governments jointly committed to pursuing efforts to limit the global temperature increase to 1.5ºC above preindustrial levels, in recognition of the disastrous impacts that will affect diverse communities around the globe above these limits. The need to now take action is urgent - we are already seeing increased extreme weather events as a result of climate change.

G20 countries represent approximately 85% of global GDP and two-thirds of the global population. G20 leadership on climate change is crucial, and global economic governance must be compatible with the requirements of the Paris Agreement to safeguard development against climate risks and to provide a safe future for all citizens of the world.

In July 2016, CAN developed a briefing of eight key climate demands for the G20.[1] Importantly, we call on the G20 countries to ensure that important agreements take place this year, such as at the International Civil Aviation Organization and in the Montreal Protocol, which will result in ambitious outcomes that are compatible with the Paris Agreement. At the 2016 G20 Summit, we urge all member countries to prioritize two key issues: ratification of the Paris Agreement, for expedited entry into force; and development of long-term strategies for sustainable development and decarbonization.

We look forward to an ambitious outcome from the 2016 G20 Summit, in which climate change is recognized not simply as an environmental problem, but as the threat to the global economy, security and sustainable development that it truly is.

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CAN Briefing: G20 Key Demands, July 2016

In December 2015, the G20, as part of the 196 Parties to the UNFCCC, committed to a historic global agreement to address climate change and pursue efforts to limit the global temperature increase to 1.5°C above preindustrial levels, so as to mitigate the harmful effects on the world’s people, biodiversity and the global environment.

According to the IPCC, the global carbon budget consistent with a 66% chance of limiting the temperature rise to 1.5ºC will be used up by 2021 if we carry on under current projections. For any fair likelihood of meeting the Paris temperature targets, our collective mitigation efforts need to be multiplied as soon as possible. Otherwise, our countries and economies will face severe impacts of unstoppable climate change, including social, environmental and economic instability. In recent years, we have seen the G20 countries take more serious notice of the role that climate change plays on its overall objectives, in particular its objective to promote financial stability. G20 leadership on climate change is extremely important since the greenhouse gas emissions of the G20 member countries account for approximately 81% of total global emissions. It is therefore imperative that the G20 countries start collaborating immediately on the implementation of the Paris Agreement, using their influence, to develop a consensus-building approach and focus on financial stability to drive stronger action on climate change.

Climate Action Network has eight key demands for the G20:

  • Ratify the Paris Agreement as soon as possible; 
  • Develop and communicate interim National Long-term Strategies for Sustainable Development and Decarbonization by 2018; 
  • Achieve an ambitious outcome on HFC phase-down this year;
  • Introduce mandatory climate-risk disclosure for investments; 
  • Remove fossil-fuel subsidies;
  • Accelerate renewable energy initiatives towards 100% RE; 
  • Ensure that new infrastructure is pro-poor and climate compatible;
  • Support effective ambition for international aviation and shipping.
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