Tag: Agriculture

CAN Intervention: SBSTA Closing Plenary SB40s, 15 June, 2014

SBSTA Closing Intervention

Thank you chair. I am Tania and am speaking on behalf of Climate Action Network.

CAN would like to remind Parties that the world’s people depend on agriculture for sustenance, and, in developing countries, for their livelihoods. Climate change puts all of this at risk. Climate policies that encompass agriculture must include safeguards and approaches that: 

  • Promote poverty reduction and climate adaptation;
  • Protect and promote:
    • ecosystems and biodiversity, 
    • rural people’s gender-equitable access to natural resources,
    • food security and the right to food,
    • the rights of indigenous peoples and local populations,
    • farm animals’ health and ability to express natural behavior, and
    • the rights of vulnerable groups, and active involvement of affected communities by supporting:
      • Adaptation policies that are embedded appropriately in the local context.
      • A rights-based approach during design and implementation of adaptation policies, ensuring the active involvement of the affected communities.

CAN is pleased to see some progress achieved here in setting up the Mechanism on Loss and Damage, but much more work needs to be done. We expect the Executive Committee to devise a strong work plan to build up an effective mechanism that helps the vulnerable

CAN looks forward to working with Parties towards these ends.

Thank you.

Organization: 

CAN Intervention: ADP Technical Expert Meeting on Land Use at SB40s, 11 June, 2014

STATEMENT BY CLIMATE ACTION NETWORK

Technical Expert Meeting on Opportunities for Action on Land Use, 11 June 2014

Work stream 2 provides an opportunity to quickly ramp-up reducing emissions from high carbon landscapes like forests, peatlands, mangroves, and other wetlands. Once these ecosystems are destroyed, or severely degraded, most of their emissions reductions potential has been lost. Polices and measures to conserve these ecosystems promote biodiversity, secure the livelihoods of local communities, and maintain resilience. One of the ways to achieve this is to prioritize REDD+ as an immediate action to fund before 2020.

The inclusion of agriculture in discussions about mitigation has its own challenges that are additional to those of forests. There must be careful consideration of food security needs and impacts on land rights, particularly for developing countries. Furthermore, sequestration of carbon in mineral soils is easily subject to reversals

Under ADP discussions on land use, permanent emission reductions could, however, focus on cuts in greenhouse gases such as methane from livestock and nitrous oxide from synthetic fertilisers, in countries where emissions are highest.

Land use under both work streams of the ADP should follow a rights-based approach.

Finally, we urge you to read the CAN submission on principles for accounting under the ADP.

 

CAN Intervention: SBSTA Opening Plenary SB40s, 6 June, 2014

Thank you chair. I am speaking on behalf of Climate Action Network.

CAN looks forward to the constructive discussion on agriculture and progress on the Nairobi Work Programme in SBSTA.

For the Nairobi Work Programme, COP19 highlighted ecosystems; human settlements; water resources; and health as priority areas. All these are of crucial importance to the needs of the people and countries particularly vulnerable to climate change. SBSTA should discuss how to pick up key findings of the expert meeting on tools for the use of indigenous and traditional knowledge and practices for adaptation, needs of local and indigenous communities, and the application of gender-sensitive approaches and tools for adaptation.

For agriculture, the world’s people depends on it for their very sustenance, and, especially in developing countries, for their livelihoods. Climate change puts all of this at risk. Among other things, the UNFCCC should:

·       Promote biodiverse climate-resilient small-scale agriculture based on agro-ecological principles;

·       Include safeguards which protect biodiversity, equitable access to resources by rural peoples, food security, the right to food, the rights of indigenous peoples and local populations, the integration of gender-sensitive approaches, as well as the welfare of farm animals, while promoting poverty reduction and climate adaptation.

CAN is happy to work further with delegates on the appropriate recommendations.

 

 

Organization: 

Support farmers to adapt to climate change

Even though the objective of Article 2 is to stabilise global emissions before food production is threatened, impacts are already being felt around the world. Floods have damaged wheat fields in Pakistan and rice fields in Thailand. Heat waves have seriously impacted the yields of Russian wheat and US maize.

Global food security is at threat. Small-scale farmers produce the majority of the world’s food, yet they are the most food insecure, and most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change.

Mitigation is of course essential to keep temperature below 1.5C - but the adaptation needs of developing countries, particularly their agricultural sectors, must have a high priority too.

Developed country Parties have suggested a focus on productivity levels. But as temperatures rise and precipitation becomes increasingly unpredictable, large areas in temperate and tropical countries may become progressively unsuitable for agriculture. ECO thinks that the SBSTA’s first step is build on detailed studies, like the report recently endorsed by the World Committee on Food Security, through mandating an assessment of climate change impacts on food production.

ECO asks Parties to provide support to the conservation of plant genetic diversity, and increase the resilience of smallholder agriculture systems. This will help small scale farmers to build their adaptive capacity, and help them integrate their farming systems in the local ecosystems.

Policies should be designed and implemented to enable small-scale food providers and other vulnerable populations to become more resilient to climate change through an integrated focus.

Related Newsletter : 

CAN Intervention on Agriculture in the COP19 SBSTA Closing Plenary by Geoff Evans, 16 November, 2013

Thank you chair. I am Geoffrey Evans and am speaking on behalf of Climate Action Network.

CAN is pleased with this week’s agriculture workshop. Everyone in the world depends on agriculture for his/her very sustenance, while many, especially in the developing countries, rely on it for their livelihoods. Climate change puts all of this at risk. Many CAN Members have a long history of working with farmers communities. The sustainability of agriculture and enhancement of food security, now and into the future, are of absolutely vital importance for us.

Following on the success of the workshop, the UNFCCC should facilitate the potential for countries to:

•  Promote biodiverse climate-resilient small-scale agriculture based on agro-ecological principles;

•  Support appropriate technology development and transfer that enhance sustainability of food production systems;

•  Include safeguards which protect biodiversity, equitable access to resources by rural peoples, food security, the right to food, the rights of indigenous peoples and local populations, as well as the welfare of farm animals, while promoting poverty reduction and climate adaptation;

•  Explore opportunities to sustainably reduce emissions from the agricultural sector; and

•  Reduce emissions from the conversion of forests and pasture to agriculture.

•  For developing country agriculture the priorities should be sustainability, climate resilience, and food security, and Parties must provide resources for promoting biodiverse, resilient small-scale agriculture and appropriate technology development and transfer.

Thank you.

Topics: 
Organization: 

Adaptation is the Soul of Agriculture

Global food production and food security are threatened by the greater variability of the climate and increasing occurrence of extreme weather events. Yet the agriculture negotiations are not moving with the urgency required to support the world's poor, especially those engaged in agriculture and related activities, in adapting to these adverse impacts. A vast majority of the world’s population is dependent on small-scale food producers -- climate change puts all of this at risk.

While underscoring the importance of mitigation in the agriculture sector, Parties should be working toward safeguards which protect biodiversity, provide equitable access to resources by rural peoples, ensure food security and the right to food, and build on indigenous and local knowledge.

Developed countries must recognise that for agriculture in developing countries, the priorities remain  food security, sustainability and climate resilience. Parties must provide financing for promoting biodiversity, ensuring resilient small-scale agriculture based on agro-ecological principles, and support for appropriate technology development and transfer that enhances the sustainability of food production systems.

 

Related Newsletter : 

CAN Intervention at COP 19 in the SBSTA Workshop on the current state of scientific knowledge on how to enhance the adaptation of agriculture to climate change impacts...

Thank you chairs. I am Ram Kishan from India and am speaking on behalf of CAN-International.

Global food production and thus food security are threatened by climate change. Every person in the world depends on agriculture for his/her very sustenance; most of the rural poor depend on agriculture for their livelihoods while agriculture has tremendous importance as a means of driving sustainable development. Local and mostly small-scale food producers feed the vast majority of world population. Climate change puts all of this at risk. The sustainability of agriculture and enhancement of food security, now and into the future, are of absolutely vital importance. Agricultural activities contribute about 15 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions (plus an additional 10 percent from clearing forests for agricultural land). Addressing these emissions will be critical if we are to achieve the UNFCCC goal of limiting average global temperature increase to two degrees Celsius.

Thus, to the greatest extent possible, policies at all levels should be designed and implemented to meet four goals:

  1. In sustainable ways, maintain and increase the security of food supplies for food insecure people, particularly in developing countries;
  2. Enable small-scale food producers and other vulnerable populations to become more resilient to climate change;
  3. Sustainably reduce emissions from the agricultural sector; and
  4. Reduce emissions from the conversion of other land to agriculture.

The UNFCCC should facilitate the potential for countries to:

  1. Promote biodiverse climate-resilient small-scale agriculture based on agro-ecological principles;
  2. Support appropriate technology development and transfer that enhance sustainability of food production systems;
  3. Include safeguards which protect biodiversity, equitable access to resources by rural peoples, food security, the right to food, the rights of indigenous peoples and local populations, as well as the welfare of farm animals, while promoting poverty reduction and climate adaptation;
  4. Explore opportunities to sustainably reduce emissions from the agricultural sector; and
  5. Reduce emissions from the conversion of other land to agriculture.
  6. For developing country agriculture the priorities should be sustainability, climate resilience, and food security, and Parties must provide resources for promoting biodiverse, resilient small-scale agriculture and appropriate technology development and transfer.

Developed countries must progress toward full and comprehensive accounting of the emissions associated with their agricultural activities, including bioenergy production and use.

Thank you.

 

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