Tag: Western and Central Africa

Association des Femmes Peules Autochtones du Tchad (AFPAT)

AFPAT is a non-profit association. It was created in 1999 and is authorized to operate since 2006. 
Objectives 
- To improve the living conditions of women Mbororo 
- Promoting the rights of women and girls in the community Mbororo 
- Facilitating access to information, education, 
- Facilitate access to health, to water, ... 
- develop small businesses and self-employment

Contact Information: 
Avenue Charles De Gaulle Rue de Bouta
N’djamèna
Chad
TD

Actions en faveur de l'homme et de la nature Ivory Coast (AFHON)

OUR VISION

A world in which vulnerable communities, particularly those in rural areas in Africa, have significantly improved their living conditions while participating in the development process of their society.

Thus, it is essential to develop the potential of actors, while ensuring a favorable environment to promote their integration into decision making through the implementation of development projects, consultancy and technical support and strengthening of organizational capabilities, institutional and individual.

OUR AIM

Contribute to social and economic welfare of the vulnerable populations for sustainable human development.

OUR APPROACH

The overall approach satisfies the three basic principles of sustainable development for the lasting quality of actions. It also captures any development project in its entirety. It enrolls in a sufficient period to give recipients time to acquire the skills taught. It also seeks the widest possible dissemination of our expertise.

OUR MISSION

Initiate actions that improve the living conditions and livelihoods of target groups and raise the collective awareness on the need to take into account environmental issues, among others, threats to Biodiversity and climate change in any development process.

Contact Information: 
Ivory Coast
CI
Email : 

Abibimman Foundation

The Foundation focus its efforts mainly on women, children and young people by promoting the needed awareness, and help address their development challenges while utilizing them as positive agents in the promotion of sustainable livelihoods, peace and development through facilitated collaboration among various partners in their communities. Abibimman Foundation a Non-Profit Oriented, Non-Partisan, Non-Governmental Organisation (RGD G5,895, DSW 2525), established in 2000 and dedicated to the promotion of sustainable Livelihoods, ameliorate conflict situations and a culture of peace, Climate Change, environmental ,Land Degradation, Agriculture, Biodiversity, democracy and development based on knowledge of cultural, civic, human right, environmental and health issues.

Contact Information: 
Flat 1/A 74 Site 3 (OPP T.DC),Community 1
Tema
Ghana
GH

Concern Universal

Our Vision

A world where justice, dignity and respect prevail for all.

Our Mission

To work in partnership to challenge poverty and inequality. We support practical actions that enable people to improve their lives and shape their own futures.

Our Values

1. Human Respect
2. Community Focus
3. Integrity
4. Partnership

We focus on Resilient Lives, and in particular agricultural development, because many of the most vulnerable people in the world depend on subsistence agriculture for their livelihood. Yet the right to food is not being upheld and over a billion people go to bed hungry every night.

Goal:

  • To ensure that vulnerable people have more resilient and sustainable livelihoods and that economic growth is equitable
Contact Information: 
Royal Stationary Building
Kairaba Avenue
P.O. Box 2164 Serrekunda
Gambia
GM

Doha: Week 2

 

Baimey Ange David Emmanuel
ONG JVE Cote d'Ivoire

For me, the second week at Doha was filled with side events and policy meetings.

To begin, Monday, December 3, the Climate & Development Network (RC & D) coordinates and I had a meeting with the French delegation and the French ambassador for climate change, Serge Lepeltier in the hall of the Delegation European French Pavilion. Present were 12 members of the RC & D from Côte d'Ivoire, DRC, France, Senegal, Mali, Niger, Chad and Togo. On the French side, we noted the presence of seven French delegation representatives.

The discussions focused on key issues in negotiations, including financing issues, the Kyoto Protocol, the NAMAs and development.Exchanges revolved around NAMAs were threefold: ambition is not enough to stay below 2 °C, the funding concerning the Fast start is currently expired and the importance remains of hot air Poland.

The Climate and Development Network then held side events to reflect on who will replace ODD MDGs. Four panelists includingbfrom Togo, Mali and France presented their work on agriculture, energy and the mobilization of civil society. The goal of this side event was for many French to express their views and ideas on the evolution of the UNFCCC process.

I had several working sessions with members of civil society to discuss the French disaster risk management, REDD and the issue of innovative financing.We continue to work on the involvement of NGOs and taking into account aspects of development in the resolution of climate change.

Globally, I think that it is important to keep with multilateralism processes concerning climate change (even if it is dangerous for those most vulnerable because the developing countries will impose their point of views.)

As I said in the JVE International press release, "While Doha was able to streamline the process and policies for international negotiations on climate change, through the adoption of the second commitment period under the Kyoto Protocol, ending the various discussion groups set up in Bali in 2007 and paving the way for discussions on the work plan for the post-2020 could lead to an international climate agreement involving all countries history. But the reality is that the UN still cannot intend to include toxic countries. Doha is a victory for Canada, Russia, Japan, Poland and the USA.

 

Region: 

Doha has proven to be a doom for the poor

 

Sixbert Simon Mwanga
Climate Action Network-Tanzania

The 18th session of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC),Conference of Parties (COP) and the 8th session of the Conference of the Parties serving as the Meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol (CMP) has concluded in Doha, Qatar on the 9th of December, 2012.

Civil Society Organizations and delegates from developing countries have clearly shown their concern with the outcomes of the negotiations. The critical areas of  concern include low ambitions to cut hot air, the length of the second commitment to Kyoto Protocol with so many loopholes and difficult to implement and a lack of commitment to provide  climate finance to operationalize the green climate fund. The conference also failed to deliver on technology issues which developing countries and African countries need to adapt and mitigate the effects of climate change.                                                             

These decisions and commitments have many negative implications to the developing countries:  migration (especially for climate change refugees), increasing poverty, frustrations, dejections, and deaths, all of which spell an infringement of the right to live. Being my first COP, I saw how respected leaders from developed countries failed to show leadership and political will in addressing the structural issues that have caused climate change.

We praise the African and developing countries delegates for standing firm and in union on damage and loss issues. For the first time, loss and damage have been accepted and international mechanisms have been set to address them. If there is one thing that we have achieved, it is work on loss and damage.

Some issues have been postponed, as usual.  By postponing important issues like technology transfer and finance to the next COP, it has proven COP18 to be the doom for the poor.  During this postponement and the slow creation of work programmes, we should know that communities are suffering from climate change. Therefore, it is unacceptable to procrastinate in making these important climate decisions.

For us who are already affected by climate change, an hour-long delay to take action feels like ten years. We find no reason for world leaders to attend the COPs while their aims are to delay actions on the negative impacts they have caused while struggling to develop their regions.

We see this as dividing the world on the efforts to fight our “common” enemy: climate change and its impacts. Scientists with their reports are disregarded; affected people in developing countries are seen as nothing while developed countries are not committed to pursuing sustainable development. They continue to invest in development pathways that are negative to the environment. We call upon leaders from developed countries to remember the role they played in emitting billions of tonnes of greenhouse gases and the necessary political will and leadership needed to emission cut targets. This is required by science to save our one and only home called the Earth.  

 

Topics: 
Region: 

Will Doha be an oasis of hope or doom for the poor?

This generation has witnessed unforgettable catastrophes of climate change. The most affected are the rural and poorer people of developing countries, Africa in particular. The African continent has contributed the least to the problem and is the one least able to cope with the impacts, because we depend heavily on climate sensitive activities for our survival. Most of the NAPAs from Africa prioritized agriculture, water, health, energy, forestry and wetlands, wildlife and tourism as the most vulnerable sectors.

The whistle for negotiations in Doha has been blown and negotiators are running from one room to another to ensure as much ground is covered as possible within one week. However, most of the outcomes of these discussions are not in favour of the interests of the developing countries, including Africa, leaving most of the negotiators dejected and frustrated.

However, there is still hope to be salvaged  Doha-Qatar negotiations and asking negotiators from Annex 1 countries must be friends in need so that we become friends indeed by focusing on the scientific imperative. They must reflect on the dangers that climate change already felt by vulnerable regions of Africa and other developing countries. This will be easily seen by finalizing and adopting a meaningful and effective second commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol, addressing the outstanding issues under the convention track in accordance with the 2007 Bali mandate and setting the negotiations under the Durban Platform for enhanced action on firm footing to adopting a legally binding agreement by 2015.

Africa is looking for an agreement that will assure to undertake mitigation and adaptation through effective finance mechanism and technology transfer.

Region: 

Pages

Subscribe to Tag: Western and Central Africa