Tag: UNFCCC

CAN Submission: Cancun Building Blocks, October 2010

THE POST-COPENHAGEN ROAD

A fair, ambitious and binding deal is needed more urgently than ever. Climate science is more compelling by the day. Impacts are coming harder and faster. Disastrous flooding in Pakistan, heat waves and forest fires in Russia and hottest recorded temperatures around the globe, amongst other devastating climate-related events, all point to the need for urgent action. Levels of warming once thought to be safe, may well not be, 1.5˚C is the new 2˚C. 

Negotiations Post-Copenhagen
Copenhagen was a watershed moment for public interest and support for climate action – and people have not lost interest. More people in more countries than ever have put their governments on notice that they expect a fair,
ambitious and binding global deal to be agreed urgently. Trust-building is essential after the disappointment of Copenhagen. Developed country leadership must be at the core of trust building efforts. Countries must show
their commitment to the UNFCCC process by driving it forward with political will and flexible positions, rather than endless rounds of repetitive negotiations. Many countries are troublingly pessimistic for Cancun, and are working to lower expectations. While others, including countries most vulnerable to climate change, maintain high expectations.

Challenges ahead of Cancun
There are many challenges to getting a full fair, ambitious and binding deal at Cancun, including:

  • Lack of a shared vision for the ultimate objective of the agreement, and the equitable allocation of the remaining carbon budget and emissions reduction/limitation commitments;
  • Sharp divisions on the legal form of an eventual outcome;
  • Failure of the US Senate to pass comprehensive legislation this year; and
  • Current economic difficulties facing many countries, which make it difficult to mobilize the substantial commitments to long-term climate finance needed as part of any ambitious agreement. 

Positive moves afoot
However, more and more countries, both developing and developed, are stepping up their efforts to pursue low-carbon development and adaptation, despite the absence of an international agreement. This can be seen in a variety of ways:

  • Investments in renewable energies have continued their exponential growth, increasing to 19% of global energy consumed;
  • Progressive countries are working to move the negotiations forward;
  • There is a growing perception that low-carbon and climate-resilient development is the only option to sustainably ensure the right to development and progress in poverty reduction. 

So, what does a pathway forward look like?

Firstly we must learn the lessons of Copenhagen. The “nothing’s agreed until everything’s agreed” dynamic from Copenhagen could mean that nothing would be agreed in Cancun. An agreement in Cancun should instead be a balanced and significant step toward reaching a full fair, ambitious & binding deal at COP 17 in South Africa. This will require parties to work together in good faith to create sufficient gains at Cancun, and a clear roadmap to South Africa. This paper outlines how that could be achieved. 

CAN Submission: View on the Review of the Warsaw International Mechanism for Loss and Damage, October 2019

Climate Action Network (CAN) International thanks for the opportunity to provide its views on the WIM review in this submission. Agreeing on a further submission at SB50 is important in order to allow Parties and observer organisations sharpen and reshape their positions and contributions along the key criteria and aspects agreed as part of the Terms of Reference (ToRs) for the Review. As a lot of important information was already presented in previous submissions by Parties and observer organisations, CAN would like to recall its contributions as important inputs and which should still be taken into account by Parties when conducting the review, including:

  • CAN International’s briefing paper for the Pre-COP;
  • CAN International’s letter to the Special Envoy for the UN Climate Action Summit;
  • CAN International’s submission “Views and inputs on possible elements to be included in the terms of reference for the review of the Warsaw International Mechanism, February 2019” and
  • CAN Submission on the Scope of the Technical Paper Exploring Sources of Support for Loss and Damage and Modalities for Accessing Support, February 2018
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CAN Submission to KJWA: Improved nutrient use and manure management towards sustainable and resilient agricultural systems, October 2019

With regard to the issues of nutrient use, manure management, and sustainable and resilient agricultural systems, the Koronivia Joint Work on Agriculture (KJWA) should pay special attention to the climate, socio-economic and environmental harm caused by the use of synthetic nitrogen fertilisers, in contrast to the multiple advantages conferred through the use of agroecological practices.

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Climate Action Network Submission: Elements to be included in Koronivia Joint Work on Agriculture (KJWA) May, 2019

At COP23, Decision –CP/23 invited parties and observers to submit their views on the joint SBSTA-SBI work known as the “Koronivia Joint Work on Agriculture” (KJWA), to inform workshops to be held atSB50 on the topics of:  2(b) Methods and approaches for assessing adaptation, adaptation co-benefits and resilience) and 2(c) Improved soil carbon, soil health and soil fertility under grassland and cropland as well as integrated systems, including water management.

Part One of this submission outlines recommendations for “Modalities and Procedures” with the purpose of shaping the KJWA mode of working to be effective, rigorous and relevant; Part Two responds specifically to 2b) and 2c) under the heading “Technical Content” with the purpose of sharing CAN members’ knowledge and expertise on technical issues related to agriculture and climate change.

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CAN Submission: Views and inputs on possible elements to be included in the terms of reference for the review of the Warsaw International Mechanism, February 2019

The IPCC report on 1.5ÅãC is a siren alerting humanity to the urgency of the climate crisis. The report shows that, already, some communities and ecosystems are being forced beyond the limits of adaptation.

Five years after the Warsaw International Mechanism (WIM) for Loss and Damage (L&D) was established at COP19 insufficient attention has been given so far to addressing the support needs of developing countries and raising additional support, including finance, to address L&D under WIM.

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CAN Intervention: Talanoa Technical Phase Wrap Up Statement, December 6

The IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5oC  is the most important contribution to the Talanoa Dialogue - it is a game-changer and clearly lays out “where we are”, “where we need to go” and “how we can get there”. 2°C of warming is much more dangerous than we thoughts a few years ago. We only have 12 years left to act swiftly and revert the current trend.  

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CAN Intervention: COP 24 Closing Statement, December 15

The IPCC 1.5C Report is clear: we have just 12 years to make radical emission cuts if we are to avert a climate catastrophe.

Here in Katowice, governments were expected to craft robust rules for the Paris Agreement that would build confidence and drive climate action, to deliver adequate and predictable finance, and to commit to enhancing their climate targets by 2020.

 

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