Tag: CAN Positions

CAN Submission: Cancun Building Blocks, October 2010

THE POST-COPENHAGEN ROAD

A fair, ambitious and binding deal is needed more urgently than ever. Climate science is more compelling by the day. Impacts are coming harder and faster. Disastrous flooding in Pakistan, heat waves and forest fires in Russia and hottest recorded temperatures around the globe, amongst other devastating climate-related events, all point to the need for urgent action. Levels of warming once thought to be safe, may well not be, 1.5˚C is the new 2˚C. 

Negotiations Post-Copenhagen
Copenhagen was a watershed moment for public interest and support for climate action – and people have not lost interest. More people in more countries than ever have put their governments on notice that they expect a fair,
ambitious and binding global deal to be agreed urgently. Trust-building is essential after the disappointment of Copenhagen. Developed country leadership must be at the core of trust building efforts. Countries must show
their commitment to the UNFCCC process by driving it forward with political will and flexible positions, rather than endless rounds of repetitive negotiations. Many countries are troublingly pessimistic for Cancun, and are working to lower expectations. While others, including countries most vulnerable to climate change, maintain high expectations.

Challenges ahead of Cancun
There are many challenges to getting a full fair, ambitious and binding deal at Cancun, including:

  • Lack of a shared vision for the ultimate objective of the agreement, and the equitable allocation of the remaining carbon budget and emissions reduction/limitation commitments;
  • Sharp divisions on the legal form of an eventual outcome;
  • Failure of the US Senate to pass comprehensive legislation this year; and
  • Current economic difficulties facing many countries, which make it difficult to mobilize the substantial commitments to long-term climate finance needed as part of any ambitious agreement. 

Positive moves afoot
However, more and more countries, both developing and developed, are stepping up their efforts to pursue low-carbon development and adaptation, despite the absence of an international agreement. This can be seen in a variety of ways:

  • Investments in renewable energies have continued their exponential growth, increasing to 19% of global energy consumed;
  • Progressive countries are working to move the negotiations forward;
  • There is a growing perception that low-carbon and climate-resilient development is the only option to sustainably ensure the right to development and progress in poverty reduction. 

So, what does a pathway forward look like?

Firstly we must learn the lessons of Copenhagen. The “nothing’s agreed until everything’s agreed” dynamic from Copenhagen could mean that nothing would be agreed in Cancun. An agreement in Cancun should instead be a balanced and significant step toward reaching a full fair, ambitious & binding deal at COP 17 in South Africa. This will require parties to work together in good faith to create sufficient gains at Cancun, and a clear roadmap to South Africa. This paper outlines how that could be achieved. 

CAN-Bond Joint Submission on the Strategic Workstream on Loss and Damage Action and Support February 2017

Climate Action Network International (CAN) and Bond Development and Environment Group welcome the call by COP 22 to propose possible activities for the five-year rolling work plan of the Executive Committee. This submission outlines proposed activities for the specific strategic workstream on enhancing action and support, including finance, technology and capacity-building, as mandated by decision 3/CP.22.

The founding document of the Warsaw International Mechanism for Loss and Damage (WIM), agreed at COP 19 in 2013, identified the facilitation and mobilisation of support as a priority. The first three years of the WIM focused on its other functions of: a) enhancing knowledge; and, b) strengthening dialogue and coordination. Thereby the WIM laid important groundwork, on which key conclusions for the way forward still need to be drawn. However, now it is time to address the more difficult areas which have lacked attention, including e.g. climate-related migration, but in particular action and support. In light of the growing loss and damage actually happening, we propose that the WIM should treat finance as a priority for the coming two years - dedicating as much time and resources to the finance (support) workstream as to the other work streams combined. The ExCom should identify the objectives and key activities to reach across 2017 and 2018 as outlined below. Though the 5-year work plan is expected to run into 2021, CAN regards it as crucial to make an ambitious start and deliver activities which make a difference on the ground as soon as possible, and not only by 2021.  

Whilst estimates of loss and damage finance needs vary, it is clear that needs are already high and likely to grow. Studies indicate that by mid-century economic global losses and damages costs may exceed $1 trillion per year, with developing countries shouldering the majority of the burden. These loss and damage costs are on top of the costs of adaptation.[1] In this context, and given the WIM mandate to facilitate and mobilise support, the overall objective of this workstream should be to urgently generate finance from predictable, adequate and sustainable sources at a scale of billions of dollars to address loss and damage in developing countries before 2020, and growing after 2020, at a scale sufficient to address the problem over and above the finance provided for adaptation. This will require enhancing the understanding of the nature, types and scales of finance developing countries require. It should also lead to enhanced support for addressing loss and damage immediately and in the near-term, in particular for the poorest and most vulnerable populations.

We propose the following activities for the finance-related work stream as part of the 5-year rolling work plan. Where necessary, this may involve the work of other bodies such as the Standing Committee on Finance, however in an effective manner which does not slow down urgently needed progress on raising funds. Many of these activities should be kick-started as early as possible, at the forthcoming ExCom5 meeting (March 2017).

 
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CAN Submission: Input to the in-session dialogues on Action for Climate Empowerment, February 2017

CAN welcomes the opportunity to provide its views on the organization of the 4th in-session Dialogue on Action for Climate Empowerment held in May 2016 and regarding the agenda of the upcoming 5th in-session Dialogue on Action for Climate Empowerment to be organized in May 2017 in Bonn.

~Summary
● The dialogue should aim at supporting the implementation of the Doha Work Programme on ACE with its agenda reflecting the action suggested in the work programme and during its intermediate review. Relevant actors identified in these documents should be invited to share information regarding their contributions, including good practices and barriers faced.
● The dialogue should be co-facilitated by a member from the civil society with recognised expertise on the issue at the agenda of the dialogue to fully reflect the participatory and multi-stakeholders nature of the Doha Work Programme on ACE.
● The agenda of the Dialogue should be focused and include linkages with parallel streams of works under the UNFCCC. This would inform the implementation by parties of their existing commitments and the integration of ACE therein. Potential subjects for the 5th dialogue could include the integration of climate education and training in the NDCs or education and training as means to strengthen climate adaptation - including in relation to the National Adaptation Plans (NAPs).
● The GEF should be invited to provide an update during the dialogue with regards to the support that it makes available to parties for the implementation of actions related to ACE.
 

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CAN Submission on Periodic Assessment of the Technology Mechanism - January 2017

CAN thanks the Parties for the opportunity to present our initial thinking on the scope and modalities for the Periodic Assessment (PA) of the Technology Mechanism (TM). 

Our KEY IDEAS:

1.The Technology Framework should provide guidance for the regular evaluation of the TM through the Periodic Assessment (PA). The Assessment must include metrics and indicators developed from the mandate of the TM.

2.The TM has the opportunity to play a central role in supporting the Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) of developing countries within its existing mandate, but in order to meet the scale of Parties’ needs, the TM must further build cooperation among institutions that have capacity to work in this space.

3.The PA should assess the mandates of the TEC in terms of how its guidance is actually having influence on appropriate technology decisions in developing countries and how well the outcomes of Technology Needs Assessments (TNAs) and Technology Action Plans (TAPs) are mainstreamed into planning at various levels, and translated into bankable projects.

4.The PA should assess the ability of the CTCN to meet its mandate in providing technical assistance to NDEs, ensuring that the knowledge generated is accessible and actionable by others, and provides adequate support for developing country NDCs.

The PA should assess the effectiveness of the TM to create and maintain the linkages with other institutions needed to ensure that technology-related climate action can be implemented at scale.

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CAN Annual Policy Document: Marrakech - Galvanizing Ambition, October 2016, Spanish Summary

Menos de once meses después del término de la COP21, el Acuerdo de París entró en vigor demostrando que existe voluntad de tomar medidas decisivas sobre el cambio climático. Con el establecimiento de un Mecanismo Mundial Basado en el Mercado (GMBM, por sus siglas en inglés) de la Organización de Aviación Civil Internacional (ICAO, por sus siglas en inglés) y la enmienda al Protocolo de Montreal para reducir paulatinamente los hidrofluorocarbonos (HFC) los líderes reafirman los compromisos establecidos para limitar el aumento de temperatura global a 1.5°C por sobre los niveles registrados en la era preindustrial.

Si la COP21 en París entregó la arquitectura general y el régimen para la acción climática en forma del Acuerdo de París, la COP22 deberá proveer los mecanismos para estimular la ambición dentro de este régimen. Esto significa facilitar y promover una transición global de características transformacionales hacia el abandono de las fuentes de energía del pasado y el establecimiento de planes que apunten a un futuro más limpio, más justo, seguro y mejor para todos. Continuando con el proceso de colaboración que se inició en la COP21, esta transformación no debe estar en manos de unos pocos, sino que debe potenciarse y fortalecerse entre todos los que ayudaron al éxito en París, incluyendo los agentes no estatales y los gobiernos.

 

CAN Annual Policy Document: Marrakech - Galvanizing Ambition, October 2016, French Summary

Avec l’entrée en vigueur de l'Accord de Paris moins de onze mois après la conclusion de la COP 21, les dirigeants ont démontré leur ambition et leur volonté de mener des actions décisives pour lutter contre le changement climatique. La mise en place d'un mécanisme de marché mondial sous l’égide de l’Organisation de l'Aviation Civile Internationale (OACI) et l'amendement au Protocole de Montréal visant à l’élimination progressive des hydrofluorocarbures (HFC) démontrent encore l'engagement pris à Paris par les gouvernements de poursuivre leurs efforts pour limiter l'augmentation de la température à 1,5 °C au-dessus des niveaux pré-industriels.

Alors que la COP 21 à Paris a défini une architecture et un régime sous la forme de l'Accord de Paris, la COP 22 devra galvaniser l'ambition de ce régime. Cela devra passer par la mise en œuvre rapide d’actions transformatrices et par l’abandon des formes d’énergie obsolètes pour un avenir plus propre, plus juste et plus sûr pour tous. En poursuivant le processus de collaboration équilibré mis en place à la COP 21, cette transformation ne devra pas être mise entre les seules mains d’un petit nombre, mais au contraire tirer sa puissance d'un sentiment de leadership partagé par tous ceux qui ont contribué au succès de Paris, y compris en catalysant l’action et en s’appuyant sur l'ambition manifestée par les acteurs non étatiques ainsi que les gouvernements.

Nous devrions célébrer l’entrée en vigueur remarquablement rapide de l'Accord de Paris, mais également nous souvenir que nous vivons désormais dans un monde à 400 ppm, dans lequel les records de température mondiale sont battus tous les mois. Partout dans le monde des populations souffrent déjà des impacts du changement climatique. Il est toujours urgent d’agir, et à Marrakech il faudra se concentrer sur une accélération de l'ambition, qui a pris du retard au cours des dernières années.

La COP 22 doit créer les conditions favorables à une action immédiate et de plus long terme. Des progrès effectifs sur le renforcement des capacités, la feuille de route des 100 milliards de dollars et un dialogue de facilitation réussi seront essentiels pour renforcer la confiance et débloquer l'ambition avant 2020. Poser les fondations à long terme du nouveau régime de Paris, se mettre d’accord sur un plan de travail et un échéancier pour les règles de fonctionnement de l’Accord - qui devront être finalisées au plus tard en 2018 - accomplir des progrès rapides sur les pertes et dommages, et définir avec une plus grande clarté la façon dont le dialogue de facilitation de 2018 devra être mené, marqueraient le succès de la COP 22.

Enfin, l'Accord de Paris réaffirme la nécessité pour tous les gouvernements de respecter, de promouvoir et de prendre en considération leurs obligations respectives en termes de droits humains dans le cadre de l’action climatique. À partir de la COP 22, le nouveau régime climatique de l'après-Paris devra être construit sur ce mandat et promouvoir l'intégration des droits humains dans ses divers domaines d'activité.

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CAN Annual Policy Document: Marrakech - Galvanizing Ambition, October 2016, English Summary

With the Paris Agreement entering into force less than eleven months after COP 21 concluded, leaders have demonstrated their ambition and willingness for decisive action on climate change. The establishment of a Global Market Based Mechanism (GMBM) under the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) and the amendment to the Montreal Protocol to phase-down climate damaging hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) further demonstrates the commitment that governments undertook in Paris to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5°C above pre industrial levels.  

While COP 21 in Paris delivered the architecture and the regime in the form of the Paris Agreement, COP 22 will need to galvanize ambition within this regime. This means to swiftly enable transformative action, shifting away from outdated forms of energy to transformational plans to a brighter, cleaner, fairer and safer future for all. Continuing the collaborative and balanced process that was initiated at COP 21, this transformation must not only be in the hands of a few, but should instead derive its power from a shared sense of leadership among all those that helped shape success in Paris, including through catalyzing and building on the ambition shown by non-state actors as well as governments.

We should celebrate the remarkably early entry into force of the Paris Agreement, but at the same time remember that we are now living in a 400ppm world, in which global temperature records are being shattered each month. People all over the globe are already suffering from the impacts of climate change. The need to act continues to be urgent, and in Marrakech we must shift attention towards rapidly scaling up ambition, which has lagged behind in the past few years.

COP 22 must create the right conditions for enabling both immediate and longer-term action. Concrete progress on capacity building, the $100 billion roadmap and a successful conclusion of the facilitative dialogue would be essential for building trust and unlocking pre-2020 ambition. In laying the longer term foundations for the new Paris regime, agreeing on a time bound work plan for the rule book, to be finalized no later than 2018, rapid progress on loss and damage, and greater clarity over how 2018 facilitative dialogue is conducted would define success at COP 22.

Finally, the Paris Agreement reiterates the necessity for all governments to respect, promote and take into consideration their respective human rights obligations when taking climate actions. Beginning at COP 22, the new climate regime in the post-Paris era must build on this mandate and promote the integration of human rights into its various areas of work.

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CAN Annual Policy Document: Marrakech - Galvanizing Ambition, October 2016

With the Paris Agreement entering into force less than eleven months after COP 21 concluded, leaders have demonstrated their ambition and willingness for decisive action on climate change. The establishment of a Global Market Based Mechanism (GMBM) under the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) and the amendment to the Montreal Protocol to phase-down climate damaging hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) further demonstrates the commitment that governments undertook in Paris to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5 °C above pre industrial levels.  

While COP 21 in Paris delivered the architecture and the regime in the form of the Paris Agreement, COP 22 will need to galvanize ambition within this regime. This means to swiftly enable transformative action, shifting away from outdated forms of energy to transformational plans to a brighter, cleaner, fairer and safer future for all. Continuing the collaborative and balanced process that was initiated at COP 21, this transformation must not only be in the hands of a few, but should instead derive its power from a shared sense of leadership among all those that helped shape success in Paris, including through catalysing and building on the ambition shown by non-state actors as well as governments.

We should celebrate the remarkably early entry into force of the Paris Agreement, but at the same time remember that we are now living in a 400ppm world, in which global temperature records are being shattered each month. People all over the globe are already suffering from the impacts of climate change. The need to act continues to be urgent, and in Marrakech we must shift attention towards rapidly scaling up ambition, which has lagged behind in the past few years.

COP 22 must create the right conditions for enabling both immediate and longer-term action. Concrete progress on capacity building, the $100 billion roadmap and success conclusion of the facilitative dialogue would be essential for building trust and unlocking pre-2020 ambition. In laying the longer term foundations for the new Paris regime, agreeing on a time bound work plan for the rule book, to be finalized no later than 2018, rapid progress on loss and damage, and greater clarity over how 2018 facilitative dialogue is conducted would define success at COP 22.

Finally, the Paris Agreement reiterates the necessity for all governments to respect, promote and take into consideration their respective human rights obligations when taking climate actions. Beginning at COP 22, the new climate regime in the post-Paris era must build on this mandate and promote the integration of human rights into its various areas of work.

Summary of key points:

Assessing, reviewing and scaling-up ambition: To keep the global temperature in line with Article 2 of the Paris Agreement, Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) will require revision and strengthening over the course of the next few years. Revising them in five-year cycles and underpinned by ambitious, national long-term strategies presents opportunities for concentrated political attention that could result in greater collaboration and rapid increase in ambition. 

·        Assessments: Through the facilitative dialogues in 2016 and 2018, and the first global stocktake in 2023, the Paris Agreement has in-built mechanisms, to assess progress and scale up ambition. COP 22 should get the ball rolling on these by successfully concluding the 2016 facilitative dialogue. The facilitative dialogue should take stock of progress and identify implementation gap. CAN proposes that a comprehensive chair’s summary is produced from the 2016 facilitative dialogue capturing the discussions as well as potential options to explore for bridging the implementation gaps.

·        The facilitative dialogue in 2018 should be conducted over the course of 2018, ensuring a process in which countries are prepared to ramp up their level of ambition in current NDCs and look at opportunities to further increase ambition in the next round. COP 22 should adopt a decision to invite countries and other stakeholders to submit their views (particularly on format, scope, inputs and outcome) on the facilitative dialogue by 31st March 2017, with a synthesis report from the UNFCCC that should inform a workshop on the facilitative dialogue at SB 46.

·        COP 22 should establish a Preparatory Process for the Global Stock take (PPGS), culminating at COP 25 in 2019: This preparatory process would help in drawing lessons from the facilitative dialogues conducted over the next few years, it would also help in developing the modalities to assess over all progress towards achieving the long-term goals of the Paris Agreement.

Enhancing action pre-2020: Limiting global warming to 1.5°C will require urgent, ramping up of pre-2020 action on mitigation, adaptation, and means of implementation.

·        Radical collaboration facilitated by the high-level champions and an improved Technical Expert Meetings (TEMs) process with a narrower focus would enable greater mitigation ambition. Along with this, strong guiding criterions for initiatives would allow UNFCCC to maintain high levels of integrity.

·        Adaptation and loss & damage should be given greater priority and tangible steps to finance them should be taken urgently. COP 22 needs to set in motion concrete steps for additional adaptation action pre-2020. This includes the identification of adaptation actions that need to be urgently financed at High-level dialogue on finance. The financial requirements for addressing loss and damage also need to be addressed at COP 22. The COP should undertake to operationalize the need for L&D finance as acknowledged in Article 8 of the Paris Agreement. 

·        COP 22 should give greater clarity on the $100 billion roadmap. The roadmap should demonstrate how a 50:50 balance between adaptation and mitigation finance is achieved. The expected COP decision on long-term finance (LTF) should also include an aspirational target for the provision of annual financial assistance for adaptation to be reached by 2020.

Transparency and Accounting of Action and Support: A core set of robust and enforceable MRV rules will be critical to driving forward the ambition necessary to ensure the success of the Paris Agreement.

·        Transparency Framework: the post-Paris transparency framework should be completed no later than 2018. The framework should be robust, ensuring the highest levels of environmental integrity and avoid double counting as well as loopholes. Monitoring, reporting and review should cover all Parties whilst still recognizing different national circumstances. The framework should provide flexibility and this should not be used as an excuse to keep the status quo, but rather as a means to enable participation, balanced by the overarching goal to enable progression and facilitate improvement over time.

·        Comparability of NDCs: A minimum requirement should be that Parties indicate a direction of improvement for the information they provide in their NDCs. This could range from information to specify emission pathways, intended use of international markets, renewable and energy efficiency targets, fossil fuel phase-out, participation of civil society, indigenous peoples, and affected local communities, respect for and promotion of human rights and gender equality, conditional aspect of the contribution, or “stretch goals”, information on financial support needed by developing countries in order to achieve their pledges.

·        Accounting for finance: In order to address existing insufficiencies in the reporting of climate finance and to avoid overestimation of climate-specific net assistance, at COP 22, SBSTA should adopt a detailed work program and timeline to advance discussions on modalities of accounting for climate finance. While discussions may need to continue at SB 46 and COP 23, the draft decision for modalities of accounting should be presented for consideration and adoption by CMA no later than 2018.

·        Accounting for adaptation: Decisions on adaptation communications should identify the capacity needs of vulnerable countries, including approaches to plan and communicate adaptation requirements in light of different warming scenarios, and promote ways to communicate on adaptation progress (and limits) effectively and efficiently for different reporting purposes.

·        Accounting for agriculture forestry and other land use: Countries must account for emissions and removals from AFOLU in a comparable and transparent way, especially those which intend to include emission reductions or increased removals from the sector as part of their NDCs. The Convention employs a land-based system of reporting and this should be used in the new agreement and should applied towards accounting for AFOLU sector.

Finance: Provision of finance is key towards galvanizing ambition and COP 22 needs to take several decisions on facilitating greater climate finance flows.

·        Adaptation: COP 22 should adopt a decision clarifying the role of the Adaptation Fund under the Paris Agreement. COP 22 should also encourage countries to announce financial contributions to both the Adaptation Fund and Least Developed Countries (LDC) Fund.

·        Loss and Damage: COP 22 must the review the WIM with a view to put more emphasis on enhancing action and support to address loss and damage and the need to provide the WIM with more resources to deliver on its tasks. The five-year work plan should be guided by strategic objectives which can develop the WIM in the next phase into a tool that is ideally in position to respond to L&D that has already taken place and prevent further loss and damage.

·        Technology: COP 22 must mandate the SBI to develop and recommend an adequate, sustainable and predictable financing model for the CTCN for adoption at COP 23, taking into account the CTCN host’s obligations to also provide and seek out funding.

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