Tag: CAN Intervention

CAN Closing Intervention, COP 21, December 2015

Thank you Mr. President,               
 
I am Amit Kumar, speaking on behalf of Climate Action Network.   

CAN recognizes this significant moment as a stepping-stone towards current and future national implementation of climate action. 

The foundation of an effective global response to climate change has been laid through this Agreement, with a strong vision of 1.5 degrees.

But with climate impacts already hitting home, current INDCs remain dangerously inadequate for staying below this limit.      

Parties must return home from Paris to improve their pledges together in 2018 so that all have ambitious targets for 2025 -- and then every 5 years thereafter. Developed countries must not shirk their commitments but must increase their financial support substantially to help developing countries cope with climate impacts and realize their mitigation potential as articulated in their INDCs.        

As part of a strong and diverse climate movement, Climate Action Network stands ready to advocate for scaling up action back home. We will ensure that the words in this agreement are operationalized and implemented. We will hold governments accountable, and continue to fight for climate justice.   

Thank you.

 

CAN COP 21/CMP 11 High-level Intervention, December 2015

Thank you Honorable Ministers and Distinguished Delegates,   

I am Mariam Allam from Climate Action Network.      

The pending elements of the Paris outcome are clear for all to see. Now is the time for ministers to find common ground.

But common ground should not undercut 1.5 degrees or ambition. A mention of 1.5 degrees is not enough; we need to operationalize it through a long-term goal of full decarbonization by 2050.

A fighting chance of closing the ambition gap that mostly rests with developed countries requires a revisiting of INDCs by 2018 at the latest.

In many countries, further ambition needs to be enabled. The Paris Agreement should stipulate that collective targets for the provision of finance should be set and updated in 5-year cycles, with separate mitigation and adaptation targets.  

Climate impacts and irreversible losses must be addressed by a global goal on adaptation linked with the 1.5-degree goal and means of implementation, and through a stand-alone article that ensures institutional anchoring and further work on loss and damage.

The Paris Agreement needs to transformative, and for that it needs to be both binding and dynamic. We must take stock of all elements every five years to get where we need to be.  

Thank you.        

CAN ADP 2-12 Closing Intervention, December 2015

Thank you for the opportunity to provide a written intervention at the close of ADP 2-12.

With a new draft text in hand, it now falls on ministers to bring four years of intense diplomatic efforts to a meaningful conclusion.

Paris must be a pivot point that catalyses ambition and assures an equitable outcome that places the needs of the most vulnerable at its core.

The Paris Agreement should anchor the 1.5-degree target and commit Parties to full global decarbonisation and a complete transition to renewable energy by 2050. All countries should develop decarbonisation strategies for 2050, to be submitted no later than 2020, with developing countries being provided with the MOI to develop and fulfill these plans.

Current INDCs do not put us on an adequate pathway for meeting the demands of science. To generate sustained ambition, Climate Action Network calls for the establishment of a “Paris Ambition Mechanism”: a robust ambition acceleration mechanism that synchronises, assesses, and ratchets up Parties’ commitments in 5- year cycles, including by matching conditional INDCs with finance. Its implementation must be tied to an enhanced Workstream 2 process, with the first review of INDCs taking place as early as possible, and before 2020.

Enhanced financial support will be critical to unlock the necessary global action. The Paris Agreement should stipulate that collective targets for the provision of financial support should be set and updated in 5-year cycles, with separate targets for mitigation and adaptation support. Developed countries should continue to be the primary contributors of climate finance, responsible for ensuring scaling up from the 100 billion floor after 2020. Yet, countries with comparable levels of capacity and responsibility would be in the position to complement these efforts.

Adaptation and loss and damage – in particular their distinct institutional anchoring as standalone issues in the Paris Agreement, and assurance of adequate support arrangements for both – remain defining issues for Paris. An early move on loss and damage will be crucial to inject positive momentum into the process and ensure the voices of the most vulnerable are heard.

Climate Action Network urges ministers in Paris to provide early signals on the issues outlined above in order to deliver the fair, ambitious, and transformative climate action package the world urgently requires. 

Organization: 

CAN ADP 2-12 Closing Intervention, December 2015

Thank you for the opportunity to provide a written intervention at the close of ADP 2-12.

With a new draft text in hand, it now falls on ministers to bring four years of intense diplomatic efforts to a meaningful conclusion.

Paris must be a pivot point that catalyses ambition and assures an equitable outcome that places the needs of the most vulnerable at its core.

The Paris Agreement should anchor the 1.5-degree target and commit Parties to full global decarbonisation and a complete transition to renewable energy by 2050. All countries should develop decarbonisation strategies for 2050, to be submitted no later than 2020, with developing countries being provided with the MOI to develop and fulfill these plans.

Current INDCs do not put us on an adequate pathway for meeting the demands of science. To generate sustained ambition, Climate Action Network calls for the establishment of a “Paris Ambition Mechanism”: a robust ambition acceleration mechanism that synchronises, assesses, and ratchets up Parties’ commitments in 5- year cycles, including by matching conditional INDCs with finance. Its implementation must be tied to an enhanced Workstream 2 process, with the first review of INDCs taking place as early as possible, and before 2020.

Enhanced financial support will be critical to unlock the necessary global action. The Paris Agreement should stipulate that collective targets for the provision of financial support should be set and updated in 5-year cycles, with separate targets for mitigation and adaptation support. Developed countries should continue to be the primary contributors of climate finance, responsible for ensuring scaling up from the 100 billion floor after 2020. Yet, countries with comparable levels of capacity and responsibility would be in the position to complement these efforts.

Adaptation and loss and damage – in particular their distinct institutional anchoring as standalone issues in the Paris Agreement, and assurance of adequate support arrangements for both – remain defining issues for Paris. An early move on loss and damage will be crucial to inject positive momentum into the process and ensure the voices of the most vulnerable are heard.

Climate Action Network urges ministers in Paris to provide early signals on the issues outlined above in order to deliver the fair, ambitious, and transformative climate action package the world urgently requires. 

Organization: 

CAN SBSTA Opening Intervention November 2015

Thank you Mr./Madam Co-Chair,

I am Harshita Bisht, speaking on behalf of Climate Action Network.

While a credible response to the climate crisis requires every sector to contribute, international transport emissions have more than doubled since Kyoto.

The Paris Agreement should urge IMO and ICAO to set strong interim targets to help meet the 1.5°C goal. These bodies must adopt strict criteria for alternative fuels; work on adaptation finance; and include their progress on carbon pricing and CO2 standards in COP reporting.     

To achieve the 1.5-degree target, all emissions reductions must moreover adhere to key social and environmental principles.

SBSTA’s work on agriculture will remain hot air unless Parties evaluate methodologies to ensure tangible results.

These should include safeguards to protect and promote gender equality, food security, biodiversity, equitable access to resources, the right to food, animal welfare, and the rights of indigenous peoples and local populations; as well as poverty reduction and adaptation.

Similarly, if recognizing transfer of international units, the Paris Agreement must require that emission reductions are real, additional, verifiable, supplemental and permanent; avoid double counting; ensure net atmospheric benefits and contribute to sustainable development.

A credible agreement will also require Kyoto Protocol credits to be canceled, or not recognized for compliance post 2020.         

Thank you.

 

CAN ADP 2-12 Opening Intervention, November 2015

CAN ADP 2-12 Opening Intervention

Thank you for the opportunity to make a written statement in advance of ADP 2-12.

23 years after Rio, we are abysmally far from where we need to be to prevent dangerous climate change.  

COP 21 must be a turning point; its outcome a springboard for the global transformation the climate crisis commands.  
 

The Paris Agreement must create a robust mechanism to accelerate ambition that synchronises, assesses, and enhances commitments in 5-year cycles. It should match conditional INDCs with finance.   

This “Paris Ambition Mechanism” should be directed by short-term urgency and long-term vision. Countries must commit to full global decarbonisation and a complete transition to renewable energy by 2050.

The post-2020 regime needs to ensure adequate support. The Paris Agreement should stipulate that collective targets for the provision of financial support should be set and updated in 5-year cycles, with separate targets for supporting mitigation and adaptation.      
 

To meet the growing needs of vulnerable people, the Agreement must also ensure strong institutional and support arrangements for adaptation and loss and damage. These separate and distinct issues must be dealt with as such. 
 

Distinguished delegates, we are at a critical juncture. COP 21 should leave no doubt that the world needs to transform, and we expect you to accelerate this transformation.

Civil Society Statement on how to strenghten the Post-2015 declaration with respect to climate change, July 2015

POST-2015 INTERGOVERNMENTAL NEGOTIATIONS- INTERGOVERNMENTAL NEGOTIATIONS ON THE OUTCOME DOCUMENT

20th July, 2015

Speaker: Noelene Nabulivou, Fiji

 

My name is Noelene Nabulivou, I am from Fiji, in the Pacific. I am here to remind us all, that climate change is real and happening.

We welcome the opportunity to offer comments on today’s discussions, giving special attention to the issue of climate change. Several member states have already acknowledged that the new draft contains some welcome references to climate change, resilience, sustainable energy  and of course CBDR. It has been also mentioned and we agree, that climate change, gender equality, healthy ecosystems, human rights, poverty eradication, and respect for planetary boundaries are inextricably linked.

However occasional and inconsistent references are not enough. The text still falls short of a vision to embrace a future in which we completely phase out fossil fuel emissions, phase in renewable energy and remain within planetary boundaries.

We urge governments to give people hope by including a reference to limiting global warming to 1.5ºC and remaining within planetary boundaries; and to heighten trust by explaining how we will achieve this goal with specific references to phasing-out greenhouse gas emissions completely and by taking immediate urgent mitigation action.

We also need a clear reference to climate justice by acknowledging that the poorest are hit hardest and that support for adaptation, loss and damage will be available.

People need certainty that governments will act to protect their fundamental and universal human rights from the adverse effects of climate change, in a manner consistent with existing legal obligations and principles in line with best available science.

Further, the Post-2015 agenda must ensure private sector accountability, including for transnational corporations in their cross-border activities.

Finally, we urge governments to be explicit about both infrastructural and psychosocial resilience; to replace all reference to “modern energy” with “safe, ​clean, sustainable and renewable energy services”; and to have a clear reference to ocean acidification and phase-out emissions.

These proposals will strengthen the draft and people's understanding of the challenges ahead. The Post-2015 agenda must speak to everyone - No more must drown, no more must die of thirst and hunger, and no one need to leave their countries because of climate crises.

Endorsements:

Climate Action Network, PICAN, Pacific Partnerships on Gender, Climate Change and Sustainable Development, Pacific CSO COP21 Urgent Action Campaign (Fiji], DIVA for Equality; DAWN, International-Lawyers.Org, and Centre for Human Rights and Climate Change Research, and the Psychology Coalition of NGOs at the UN, Centre for Human Rights and Development Studies (CHRDS), Pathways to Peace (PTP), Institute for Planetary Synthesis (IPS), Women's Environment and Development Organization (WEDO), Christian Aid.

 

Topics: 
Organization: 

CAN Intervention Informal open-ended consultations on the expectations for the Paris conference

Climate Action Network statement – 9 June 2015
Informal open-ended consultations on the expectations for the Paris conference

Tuesday, 9 June 2015, 13:15-15:00 

Thank you, incoming presidency and distinguished delegates, 

I am Jonas Bistrom, and I am speaking on behalf of Climate Action Network.

The world is looking to Paris, expecting a transformational change. A strong, long-term vision for a world in which fossil fuel emissions are phased out no later than 2050, and 100% renewable energy for all phased in, is essential.

Realising the transformational change necessary requires significantly increased mitigation ambition and finance, with developed countries leading the way.

The needs of the most vulnerable should be at the heart of the 2015 agreement. CAN supports a global adaptation goal that links adaptation requirements to mitigation efforts.

Unfortunately, this is not always sufficient – which is why loss and damage must be anchored in the agreement on an equal footing with adaptation.

Key political issues have to be dealt with soon. We urge you to wrap up what can be concluded early on, and to manage the time that remains efficiently and effectively.

As COP 21 draws closer, the Presidency should welcome broad and globally inclusive civil society involvement to ensure a transparent process receptive to the voices of the people.

Finally, for a legitimate negotiating space, we ask the French Presidency to seriously reconsider COP21’s sponsorship by big polluters and corporations with direct ties to dirty energy. 

Thank you.

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