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South African civil society calls on government to boost national climate action

South African civil society organisations have released a statement to their government calling for less talk and more national action to tackle climate change and boost the clean energy transition. These organisations collectively emphasise that human rights, like access to sufficient food and water, are directly threatened by climate change. They urge the South African government to protect these human rights by taking concerted action to shift away from dirty, resource intensive fossil fuels and harness instead the massive potential of clean, renewable energy. They also provide the South African government with a number of improvements that can be made at the national and sub-national levels to enhance the effectiveness of climate change dialogue and policy-making. You can read the full statement below

Statement from concerned civil society organisations regarding the lack of ambition for the National Climate Change Dialogue

Climate change is the greatest challenge faced by human kind.  Without determined political will and practical action by Government, business and society to tackle both the emissions that cause climate change and the adaptation needed to survive its impacts, we risk derailing development and putting the wellbeing and prosperity of the people of South Africa at risk.  What is more, human activities that drive climate change are destroying biodiversity and ecosystems that are vital to our survival and that of future generations.

The time for words is over, we need action from the South African Government now. Many civil society organisations are therefore coming together to raise our collective voices at this critical point ahead of the next round of climate talks at COP20 in Lima this December. 

South Africa faces a desperate fight for climate justice: many of our poorest communities are already living with the impacts of climate change. Global green house gas emissions continue to rise driving increases in extreme weather events such as drought, flooding and rising temperatures which are leaving people struggling with more water shortages and ever-rising food prices. These impacts fall hardest on the poorest and most vulnerable in our communities but they affect us all.

The South African constitution protects basic human rights including access for all to sufficient water and food and an environment that is not harmful to our health or wellbeing. All of these rights are threatened by climate change. 

The President acknowledges that we are a water scarce country and that climate change will make the situation worse. So why is the Government looking at future coal power stations and increasing mining activity, when taking coal out of the ground then preparing and burning it uses huge amounts of water?

We seek a just transition for South Africa and its people away from the current and planned future dependency on coal, oil, gas and nuclear power toward a socially inclusive development path, built on renewable energy including solar and wind. The South African government must hold to its most ambitious emissions targets if we are to make our vital contribution to global emissions cuts and together hold average global temperature rises to 1.5 degrees.

As such we call on Government to reaffirm its commitment to pursuing not a ‘lower carbon economy’ but a truly inclusive low carbon economy by stopping investments and subsidies into the fossil fuel industry and choosing a pathway that increases investment in renewable energy to unlock greater access to electricity and that focuses on skills development and job creation in the renewable energy sector. 

We are calling on the South African government to show much greater ambition and match words with actions, to stick to and enforce its most ambitious targets for cutting greenhouse gas emissions.  South Africa must also stand alongside its fellow developing countries, calling on the developed countries that have caused climate change, to do much more to cut their emissions and deliver on the finance and technology transfer needed to support adaptation in developing countries.

To do this effectively, it is time for Government to walk the talk and deliver on its promises. Government has set emissions and policy targets that it is already missing. Fine policies are not enough, we must see real political will to drive the climate change agenda in a coherent way across government, so that development planning takes account of the inter-relations between energy, water, agriculture and food sovereignty.

The ongoing Integrated Energy Planning (IEP) process, which is expected to deliver a final report with a national energy ‘Road Map’ for Cabinet approval this financial year, is the most fundamental indication of government’s commitment to effective climate change response and inclusive development. 

All national and provincial departments – not just the Department of Environmental Affairs – must accelerate putting in place co-ordinated plans to both mitigate for and adapt to climate change, and then get on with delivering interventions that will protect and enhance the lives of all South Africans.

It is the South African people who will bear the full force of climate change so it is the wellbeing and livelihoods of people that should be paramount in efforts to address the issue rather than the interests of those businesses which contribute the most to emissions. 

It is disappointing that the National Climate Change Dialogue favours big business and the current economic paradigm while excluding many of the communities already fighting against increased hunger, water shortages, falling crop yields and lack of access to electricity.

Our organisations re-commit to ensuring that engagement takes place around national development policy, including over the next year as the UNFCCC negotiations move toward COP21 in Paris. Now Government must commit to and guarantee that it will enable regular, meaningful participation of civil society and communities affected by climate change in policy development and implementation.

We call for transparency and high ambition in the process of setting emission reduction targets per economic sector (the Desired Emission Reduction Outcomes). Undertakings by businesses to meet ‘carbon budgets’ should be made public. The work of the Inter-Ministerial Committee on Climate Change needs to be accounted for. All affected parties must be kept appraised of the nature and content of these processes.

Climate change is happening now. It is affecting the lives of all South Africans. It is time for the South African Government to act, not talk, if we are to avoid worsening hunger, water scarcity and poverty.

The organisations here listed endorse this statement:

Project 90 by 2030

Southern African Faith Communities’ Environment Institute (SAFCEI)

Earthlife Africa

Greenpeace Africa

Oxfam in SA

World Wildlife Fund

350.org Africa & Arab world Region

Fossil Free South Africa

 

Bangladeshis protest against coal expansion in the Sundarbans

Bangladeshis will take to the streets of the capital, Dhaka, this weekend in a colourful, and popular protest against plans for a dirty coal plant that will demolish and degrade huge parts of the Sundarbans - the world’s most pristine mangrove forest, an important tiger reserve, and a UNESCO world heritage site.

People will be taking part in a rally that will showcase local artists, singers and other cultural icons - all of whom are calling on the Bangladeshi government to ditch proposed plans to build a coal-fired power plant in Rampal, a site right on the edge of the precious Sundarbans. This is not their first rally, more than 20,000 joined last year, and they will not stop until the dirty power plant plans are overturned.

The people of Dhaka join a fast-growing group of brave communities taking to the streets and even the seas to prevent dirty energy expansion plans which threaten the world’s most pristine and iconic habitats. A group of Pacific Warriors blockaded an Australian coal port last week, in a spectacular effort to protect their homes and the Great Barrier Reef from dirty energy expansion.

Also last week, the people of the Philippines held a national day of action against coal. More Filipinos are joining every day with the group of dedicated walkers on their 1000km climate change awareness march from Manila to Tacloban - ground zero for typhoon Haiyan/Yolanda that devastated the Philippines in 2014.

The people of Bangladesh are one of many brave communities taking a stand against coal power. The huge coal-plant proposed for Rampal would threaten the world’s most ancient mangrove forest with destruction, dredging, and pollution from boiling, toxic effluent. The effects of the planned coal-plant construction would not only exacerbate climate change, but directly exacerbate climate impacts.

In the recent past the Sundarbans have protected local communities from dangerous cyclones Aila and Sidr. The mangroves provide vital protection from storm surges exacerbated by sea level rise that are a direct result of increased coal use. On top of this the rich Sundarban ecosystems support millions of people with food, water and artisanal industry.

UNESCO have raised serious concerns with both Bangladeshi and Indian governments over the proposed coal plant in the Sundarbans. The questions raised by UNESCO have still not been answered and now the voice of the people of Bangladesh is rising to join the challenge - will the regional governments take heed?

40-Day Climate Walk to Tacloban kicks of in the Philippines

Climate change advocates from various sectors urged world governments to “walk their climate talk” as they launched the Climate Walk, dubbed as “A People’s Walk for Climate Justice.”

From the starting point at “Kilometer Zero” in Rizal Park, Manila, the groups will walk 1,000 kilometers in 40 days to arrive in Tacloban, ground zero of Yolanda (Haiyan), on November 8, exactly a year since the super typhoon first made landfall.

The festive send-off program for the Climate Walk included Manila Vice Mayor Isko Moreno, National Youth Commissioner Jose Sixto 'Dingdong' Dantes III, Climate Change Commissioners Heherson Alvarez and Yeb Saño, running priest Fr. Robert Reyes, representatives of a broad group of civil society organizations [1], and the Catholic Church [2

“The Climate Walk is dedicated to all people in the Philippines and around the world who confront the reality of climate change. It aims to empower communities and help them become resilient to the impacts of disasters and climate change,” Saño said before they departed from Luneta.

The advocates called on governments to do their fair share in keeping global warming below the tipping point to save the Filipino people, and all others who are most vulnerable to climate change.

The Walk was launched a week after two landmark events in New York: The People’s Climate March, in which 400,000 people marched to call for urgent climate action, followed by the United Nations Climate Summit, wherein over 160 world leaders announced their commitments to solve the climate crisis.

"This walk is about fighting back! We need to unite as a people and demand a climate treaty that will give justice and compensation to countless families, communities and municipalities that are already being severely affected and devastated by climate change impacts. We must reclaim our people's rights to a safe, secure and sustainable future." Von Hernandez, Executive Director of Greenpeace Southeast Asia stated.

You can find out more about the walkers taking part and you can keep up to date with their progress by visiting the Climate Walk website or facebook page.

 

Fasting leaders urge Heads of State to show courage on climate

During the last week prominent fasters representing secular and religious communities all over the world have come together to write letters to Heads of States. They are challenging these Heads of State to demonstrate leadership to tackle climate change at the upcoming UN Climate Summit on 23 September 2014. 
 
The letters have been published in various news outlets and on social media. You can download copies of the letters below, please feel free to share with your various networks. For any questions on the letter, please contact ehickson@climatenetwork.org 

New economics report urges leaders to phase out fossil fuels

major new report launched today by economic experts in New York City shows how a swift transition to a low-carbon society will unlock a raft of benefits for communities, businesses and governments while reducing the risks of dangerous climate change. The report from the New Climate Economy is called “Better Growth, Better Climate”, it comprehensively dispels the myth that climate action comes at the cost of people’s living standards and calls on government and business leaders to urgently phase-out fossil fuels.

The message ringing out from every page of this report is that there are no strong arguments left to justify sticking with outdated fossil-fuels. As such, the authors call for all countries to aim for a global phase-out of unabated fossil fuel power generation by 2050. These economic experts call for high-income countries to commit now to end the building of new unabated coal-fired power generation and asks middle-income countries to limit new coal plant construction now and halt new builds by 2025.

The report is based on a year-long study conducted by research institutes the world over, from China, India, the US, Brazil, Korea, Europe and Africa. The findings are being spearheaded by leading names in finance, business and politics who argue they provide compelling evidence that world leaders should urgently ramp up the low-carbon transition to unlock a cleaner, healthier society run on renewable energy which can also limit the impacts of climate change.

The report findings substantiate this argument by showing that as well as reducing climate risk, phasing out fossil fuels and cutting carbon will mean new and better jobs, cleaner air, improved health, lower poverty and more energy security. The economic minds behind the study use the building of climate smart cities as an example. They argue that cities that are better connected and more compact with good public transport links will save the world more than US $3 trillion over the next 15 years and significantly improve quality of life.

New Climate Economy emphasise that the low carbon transition is already well underway. A growing number of successful businesses, cities and countries are actively lowering climate risk, while creating jobs and healthier, happier communities. Thanks to rapid technological innovations and fresh investment in infrastructure unlocking the benefits of climate action is more affordable and feasible than ever, according to the authors.

The report urges government and business leaders to seize the day. Between now and 2030 US$90 trillion will be invested in cities, land use and energy infrastructure around the world and the investment choices made now will shape the future - will locking us into either a low- or a high-carbon society. The authors dismantle the argument that a clean energy future costs more to achieve and they even lay out a neat policy prescription to help leaders along the low-carbon pathway.

These include:

  • integrating climate change into core economic decisions and accelerating the low-carbon transition;

  • a strong, lasting and fair international climate agreement;

  • phasing out subsidies for fossil fuels and agricultural inputs and incentives for urban sprawl;

  • introducing strong, predictable carbon prices;

  • substantially reducing the costs of low-carbon infrastructure investments;

  • scaling up innovation in key low-carbon and climate resilient technologies;

  • making connected and compact cities the preferred form of urban development;

  • stopping deforestation of natural forests by 2030;

  • restoring at least 500 million hectares of lost or degraded forests and agricultural lands by 2030;

  • accelerating the shift away from polluting coal-fired power generation.

This report, dubbed “Stern 2.0”, comes just days before hundreds of thousands of people take to the streets at more than 2,000 events in 150 countries around the world to show their support for a low-carbon transition. This comes also as more than 120 heads of state gather in New York for the UNSG Climate Summit.

The summit is a chance for world leaders to re-engage with climate change at the highest level and pledge the commitments that will speed up the transition away from fossil fuels that is already underway, driven by communities, businesses and investors who see the benefits of a clean energy future. It is a chance for government leaders to begin realising the vision outlined in this report.

Climate change and poverty: why action is needed

A set of Sustainable Development Goals to be agreed next year offer a vital opportunity for the international community to tackle the way that climate change is driving people into poverty, saysa new report.

‘The Right Climate for Development: why the SDGs must act on climate change’ released ahead of the twin UN meetings for Heads of State in New York – the UN Climate Summit on 23 September and the opening of the General Assembly debate on post-2015 development on 24 September 2014.

The work is in response to the latest findings of the authoritative Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) that has warned climate change is a massive threat to poverty reduction and sustainable development.

“Fact is the solution to extreme poverty, climate change and environmental degradation requires an integrated response if we are to get lasting change. Often we find climate change is a common cause but it is how this manifests itself which is key: changes in climate play out through natural resources – the underlying environment that particularly people in poverty most directly depend on” said David Nussbaum, CEO of WWF-UK to representatives of the public, private and NGO sector at the launch of the report in London on 10 September 2014.

The new report, written by Christian Aid, WWF-UK, Greenpeace, Oxfam GB, CAFOD, Practical Action and CARE International, says it is now clearer than ever that without action to tackle climate change, efforts to eradicate poverty will be fruitless.

The greater plight for poor and vulnerable people caused by climate change can be already seen now. They are most vulnerable to the impact of climate change, suffering the loss of their homes, jobs and crops, along with ill-health from the spread of disease exacerbated by climate change.

The report says rising sea levels and the increasing frequency and intensity of extreme weather events such as typhoons and floods – all the result of global warming – are claiming lives, destroying or damaging homes and infrastructure, reducing crop yields, and ruining employment prospects.

These impacts will only increase, it warns, if action is not taken to cut carbon emissions and support is not given to communities to adapt to the changes that they are already experiencing.

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which will succeed to the Millennium Development Goals that expire at the end of 2015, must therefore include a standalone goal on tackling climate change. And they must also commit governments to robust action to support emission cuts and build the resilience of communities affected by climate change.

For developing countries which must not be deprived of the opportunity of progress, the SDGs need to signpost how progress can be achieved without adding carbon emissions. They must be a blue print for low carbon development the world over, encompassing all sectors affected by climate change, including health, agriculture urban development, energy, water access and income generation.

Specifically, the report says, the goals should:

  • Include a standalone goal on climate that will encourage all countries to follow a low carbon development pathway.
  • Take on board that most of the new infrastructure for low or zero-carbon development will need to be built or start development during the SDGs timeframe of up to 2030.
  • Recognise the many benefits increased access to sustainable, affordable, reliable and safe energy will bring to poverty reduction, education, health, women’s empowerment and sustainable livelihoods.
  • A goal already proposed on growth and employment goal should recognise the benefits that low carbon development, particularly investment in renewable energy production and energy efficiency, can have in creating decent employment.
  • And a proposed goal to ‘ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns’ needs to address expressly the role that unsustainable consumption and production in richer societies plays in driving climate change.
  • Acknowledge the fact that to decarbonise electricity by up to 100 per cent by 2050, is crucial if temperature rises are to be kept below 2 degrees Celsius.

This blog has been reproduced with the kind permission of WWF International. The original is here: http://climate-energy.blogs.panda.org/2014/09/10/climate-change-poverty-action-needed/

PICAN's key priorities for the Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States

Pacific Islands Climate Action Network's key priorities for the Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States (SIDS).  Apia, Samoa. September 1-4, 2014.

1. Stronger action is needed to cut emissions, in line with a global goal of limiting temperature increases to 1.5°C

If we are to have any hope of avoiding the potentially catastrophic impacts of a changing climate, the world needs a strong, binding agreement in 2015.  The international community needs to learn from Small Island Developing States.  We are leading the way, by taking action to reduce emissions today.  All countries must act in accordance with their historical responsibility and respective capabilities. Developed countries must reduce their emissions as soon as possible, and must make far stronger commitments than are currently on the table.

Pacific island communities are already vulnerable to climate-related hazards including droughts, floods and intense cyclones.  Without world-wide action now, island communities will face ever-greater threats from changing rainfall patterns, ocean acidification, coral bleaching, salination and inundation from sea-level rise.  Island communities who grow their own food and rely on resources from the sea are especially vulnerable to the effects of a changing climate.

The Secretary-General of the United Nations, Ban Ki Moon, has called for world leaders to come together in New York (September 23 2014) with bold new commitments.  Pacific island countries are responding to this call for greater action.  However leaders from all States must use this historic opportunity to inject momentum into international climate negotiations and redouble their efforts to secure a global agreement.  

2. Greater commitment is needed to adaptation financing for Pacific island countries

Pacific Small Island Developing States are already experiencing the effects of a changing climate. Pacific women, men and young people are strong and resilient.  We are drawing on our own strengths to adapt.  But now it is time for the international community to put its money where its mouth is.  Wealthier nations have to provide adequate, additional and predictable financing to help Pacific communities adapt to a changing climate.  Global funds – such as the Green Climate Fund – must be accessible for Pacific island governments, communities and civil society organisations.  

Pacific island states are leading the world when it comes to integrating climate change adaptation into national and regional development planning.  Island policymakers have developed a regional Strategy for Climate and Disaster Resilient Development.  Integrating adaptation into existing planning, particularly around disaster risk reduction, helps to address the underlying causes of disaster and climate risk. However countries responsible for our changing climate must provide additional financing for climate change adaptation in Pacific island countries.  

Because many island communities are reliant on local natural resources, they are especially vulnerable to natural disasters and the slow-onset changes wrought by climate change. More support should be allocated to community-based adaptation measures.  Recent experience in the Pacific indicates that civil society organisations working together – in coordination with national governments – can implement effective community-based adaptation measures.  Adaptation programs must address the unique challenges faced by all community members.  Women and young people in particular have experience and skills that can contribute to adaptation solutions, but they are too often excluded from decision-making.  

 

3. Carbon emitters need to take responsibility for unavoidable ‘loss and damage’ in Pacific island states

Pacific Small Island Developing States are not responsible for global climate change, yet we will bear the greatest impacts wrought by a changing climate.  Even if drastic action is taken now to reduce carbon emissions into the atmosphere, Pacific island countries are still likely to experience significant losses, and permanent damage associated with climate change.   Countries responsible for emitting greenhouse gases into the atmosphere must address the impacts of their pollution. Toward that end, loss and damage mechanisms must be anchored in the text of a global agreement to tackle climate change.

 

 4. Governments need to ensure the human dignity of those affected by climate change  

Without action now to avoid drastic changes to our global climate, many island communities will face new threats that will undermine their food and water security.  Coastal communities are very likely to experience stronger storm surges, increased erosion and inundation as sea levels rise. Salination is likely to compromise groundwater resources for some atoll communities. Changing rainfall patterns will impact on coastal and inland communities, with the potential to undermine agricultural practices that have provided sustainable livelihoods for countless generations.  For some communities, the effects of a changing climate may even make their homes uninhabitable. Governments must develop strategies to protect the rights and dignity of Pacific women, men and young people who will be adversely affected by a changing climate.  Particular attention must be given to those who will be temporarily displaced, or forced to resettle elsewhere.

For Media Enquiries please contact:

PICAN convenor Shirley Laban: +685 7297617; Pacific Conference of Churches climate campaign officer Peter Emberson +685 7291464. 

Both Shirley Laban and Peter Emberson are available for interview

Vale Gaines Morrow Campbell III

The climate movement has lost one of its brightest lights. 

Gaines Morrow Campbell III, co-chair of the Climate Action Network-International Board of Directors for five years, passed away on the Fourth of May, 2014, in Brazil after a lengthy illness. 

Gaines was a long-time climate change specialist at Brazilian NGO Vitae Civilis.  Originally from Philadelphia, in the US, Gaines lived in Brazil for over 30 years. He was an oceanographer and conducted some of the first research around thermal reversal of the Gulf Stream in the North Atlantic in winter, while at the Physical Oceanography Department at Woods Hole Oceangraphic Institution. He lectured on environment and sustainable development issues. 

He campaigned long and hard on environment and development issues, both in Brazil and internationally.  As well as attending almost every UNFCCC session in recent times, he worked with GT Climate FBOMS, Esquel Brazil Foundation, the ANAP - Headwaters Association of Pure Waters (Juquitiba), and the Rotary Club of Juquitiba. He also coordinated  many local boards and committees in Brazil, including a three-term stint as Vice-President of the Ribeira and South Coast Watershed Committee (Bacia Hidrográfica do Ribeira de Iguape e Litoral Sul).

Climate Action Network sends its condolences to Gaines' family and friends throughout the world. We know you are now at rest in a garden as beautiful as your own. 

 

Please feel free to leave your reflections, memories and tributes to Gaines in a comment below. Comments will be manually approved to guard against spam. 

 

 

Side Event Report: Risks and opportunities of different scenarios for integrating climate change into post-2015

Side Event Report: Risks and opportunities of different scenarios for integrating climate change into post-2015
 
Hosted by: CAFOD, CAN International, Beyond2015, UN Millennium Campaign
9 January, 2014

 
French Development Minister—lead UNFCCC negotiator, Pascal Canfin
·      Top priority of the French now because hosting COP21 in Paris in 2015

·      Want to set a positive mood for success in Paris on climate

·      Don’t want to export all the problems and obstacles that are still unsolved in the COP process to the SDG discussion—otherwise counterproductive

·      Discussing SDGs and a new development pattern without discussing climate change is nonsense a

·      At the beginning of the century for the World Bank climate change wasn’t an issue—the issue was how to fight poverty and climate change was out of the scope.  Now they launched a report and 4 degree warming – main threats on food security and other issues is climate change

·      2 dangers in the process-the first is to duplicate and export the UNFCCC problems

·      second danger is to forget about climate in the SDGs

·      Do we want an SDG on climate? French view—the only agreement that we have on climate so far is to keep global warming under 2 degree warming.  If we are able to take this on board and not to open how to make this happen, why not have an objective on climate?

·      If we have a proper objective on climate, which is 2 degree target, there will be targets and indicators on which there is no agreement.  If we go down this line, we are going to export the issues of the UNFCCC

·      The best option: the climate objective of 2 degree in the broad vision of the whole purpose of the SDG process and to see taking this into account what odes it mean to have a world of below 2 degrees warming in terms of transportation, agriculture, urbanization, etc—using the SDG process that gives substance to things outside of the COP process.  Using the complementarity of the process more than the overlapping areas

·      SDG process objective by objective would focus on how to implement the 2 degree objective in terms of cities, agriculture, transportation, energy etc

 
Ronald Jumeau, Climate change Amb to Seychelles

·      Cannot be a successful post-2015 agenda and set of SDGs without successfully tackling climate change

·      A weak climate agreement in 2015 will cripple if not doom attempts to have a truly effective post-2015 framework

·      The SDGs and agenda won’t mean a thing if the SIDS aren’t even around to benefit from them or achieve them

·      There cannot be sustainable development without survival and there can’t be survival without tackling climate change

·      How do we do this without being accused of encroaching on the UNFCCC negotiations?

·      It’s understandable for the people in the post-2015 process to be wary of how climate change can be included in the agenda because of the UNFCCC political issues

·      AOSIS feels that they can’t place all the hopes in the formal negotiations as of now—informal alliance with LDCs on this.  So the climate agreement in 2015 won’t be ambitious enough so there has to be some thinking outside the silos

·      Climate change conference in Durban – approached negotiating partners outside of the formal negotiations to see what countries can do before 2020 to increase mitigation ambition and take urgent and effective action outside of the negotiations themselves? To increase what countries are already doing?

·      No formal obligation to adopt negotiation pledges there already exists a range of policies and technologies that countries are using cost-effectively to reduce emissions – many actions have benefits for adaptation, reducing pollution, fiscal stability and competitiveness etc.  If we can scale up these actions it can help increase ambition in the negotiations

·      Can’t you translate these actions into the formal agreements?

·      Energy—large emissions from fossil fuels –every country in the world seems to have embarked on or a plan/strategy for renewable energy as part of national and collective actions to tackle climate change.

·      Found a willingness with negotiating partners to see how countries can help each other enhance and replicate what countries are already doing or willing to do in transportation, energy, buildings etc

·      We are not waiting for a climate agreement to take action, we are acting now but we need help doing it (MOI). So if we tackle these MOI issues now, it will help the negotiations later. 

·      Would bring in civil society/academia/private and public sector—opens a door for governors and mayors

·      Danger of bringing in the attitudes from the other negotiations into the post-2015 process, but even major emitters which are reluctant to make or increase commitments under the formal process, even they wanted to talk about this.

·      Warsaw decided to accelerate this initiative by launching a technical process on how this could be done. In the UNFCCC process—they are looking at it from a sustainable development angle.

·      Not a question of if it should be done but it should be done.  But how do we do it? Based on AOSIS’ experience on getting people to think outside the siloes. 

 
Olav Kjørven—Special Adviser to the UNDP Administrator on the Post-2015 Development Agenda
·      Strongly agree with Minister when made the point that it is naïve to think that the things that can’t be resolved in the UNFCCC process can be solved in another when many of the same people show up

·      Lots of scope for significant synergy when we go beyond looking at the UNFCCC process in a narrow sense (Workstream 2 in the ADP)

·      Option 4 in the options paper: (based on science), is probably not realistic at this point.  What should it look like if scientific knowledge were to reign supreme. We need to work further on option 4, not because it’s necessarily realistic, but we need to strive for this.

·      Option 3 is interesting to discuss because with the mainstreaming (option 1) and this, it could help things progress – build flexibility in the UNFCCC framework with a placeholder approach

·      Critical to frame the climate related goal language in developmental terms (has to be a about dev and reducing poverty and increasing good conditions for people all over the world)—none of the proposals have so far done this

·      Have to force ourselves to think more about where we want to be in 2030 than where we are now in terms of political realities.

·      Post-2015 agenda really is about where we want to be in 2030 and long term

 
Wael Hmaidan, Director of CAN International:
·      In November OWG session on energy—had a side event for this paper and there was a lot of skepticism, but this week there is more positive energy for the paper and how climate change should be reflected – should really look at this and realize that political will does change

·      Having climate change part of the development agenda is key

·      Ministries of Environment are often in charge of climate change and it doesn’t become very high on the agendas, because it’s not development in that regard.  Having part of the development movement moves it higher up the agenda

·      Want to continue working on a new draft of the paper based on the discussions this week and hopefully finalize a new draft in the next month or so

·      The narrative option is not enough—basically only having climate change in the narrative.  Important to have it in the narrative but not enough.  Helps it not just be an environmental issue to redefine it as a developmental issue

·      Option 1: climate proofing of goals—address climate change in the goals.  What we already sort of have consensus on because most people agree that we cannot have goals without addressing their sustainability and climate change.  Urbanization goal has to address CO2 and GHG emissions.  Lowest common denominator

·      Options 2 -4 for a climate goal. 

·      Options 3: using existing agreements for a goal—keeping 2 degrees warming that’s already been agreed upon by UNFCCC.  Problem with this goal is that the Summit for post-2015 is 7 weeks before COP21 so whatever ends up in the SDGs might not be relevant depending on what comes out of Paris. 

·      Option 4: most ambitious and based on science –provides increased momentum

·      Civil society is looking at a phaseout of GHG emissions goal—doesn’t have to be a year, but a goal provides a vision of how we want society to look like. Includes elements of what the OWG Co-Chairs said about not being threatening etc. How we want to develop towards a future.

 
Frederick D’Souza, Caritas India Director:
·      Different views of climate change – some people believe it’s normal, some believe it’s caused from only natural disasters, and some believe it’s from humans

·      In India see the impacts of climate change

·      For all our needs there is enough—development should be based on a need, not greed. 

 
 
Discussion
·      No risk of losing binding commitments

·      Governments have to come to the UNFCCC and say their positions and try to reach agreement—mandated by the UN that they have to meet and have a legally binding commitment.  Phase-out would be voluntary and a vision and would provide room for growth

·      Planetary boundaries—one is the climate and CO2 but so many issues and not sure that putting them all together would be helpful.  Ex. Oceans, climate and other ones are so interlinked and if climate change alone is creating all this discussion, it would be even worse if you lumped them together

·      SIDS are always out there pushing the envelope and if there’s a way to get away with it, this is out.  AOSIS has never been shy about this stuff.

·      The reason SIDS are pushing the workstream 2 and things outside the formal process is to get stuff done and countries to commit to things in the parallel process and show that they’re already doing it.

Event Invitation: Thinking outside the silos - different scenarios of integrating climate change into post-2015

Thinking outside the silos: different scenarios of integrating climate change into post-2015

Date: 9 January 2014

Time: 1.15-2.30 pm

Location: Conference Room E, UN HQ, New York

This side event during the 7th session of the Open Working Group on SDGs will investigate different options of integrating climate change into the post-2015 framework.

Climate change is an existential threat that will continue to disproportionately affect the poorest and most vulnerable people and places, impacting negatively on those least responsible for the climate crisis. Without addressing the causes
of climate change and all its impacts, comprehensively, goals on eradicating poverty will be ineffective, even in short term, and fail to ensure sustainable development.

During this side event, the panellists will discuss the risks and opportunities of different scenarios for integrating climate change and how this can impact on other UN processes, including the UNFCCC process. A newly published paper
put together with the support of Beyond 2015 and CAN-International, two major global NGO networks involved in climate change and post-2015, will serve as the basis for the discussion. The panel will be followed by questions and
answers from the floor.

Panel
- Pascal Canfin, Minister for Development, France
- Ronald Jean Jumeau, Ambassador, Permanent Mission of the Republic Seychelles to the United Nations
- Olav Kjorven, Special Adviser on post-2015, UNDP (TBC)
- Frederick D’Souza, Director, Caritas India
- Wael Hmaidan, Director, CAN-I

Chair
Corinne Woods, Director, UN MC

This event is supported by the Government of France

Contact: Bernadette Fischler, CAFOD, bfischler@cafod.org.uk

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